Koda Tiny Home Now Available Outside Estonia

When it comes to tiny homes, a clever and space-saving interior layout is an absolute must. And the Koda micro home definitely has that covered. The home was created by the Estonian firm Kodasema, an it is a modern home with a very small footprint, while also being prefabricated off-site and very easy to assemble.

The Koda has a very modest floorspace of just 284 sq ft (26.4 sq m), yet it appears much more spacious than that. It is made out of concrete, which is an interesting choice as far as prefab homes go. It arrives in sections that can be assembled, or disassembled, in one working day. The home also does not require a foundation and can be built on a wide array of surfaces.

Koda is a two-story home, with the living room, kitchen, bathroom (with toilet and bath/shower), on the lower level and the bedroom and laundry room on the upper level. The home can be fitted with a solar power system, programmable LED lighting, and a digital door lock.

In addition to the Koda home, Kodasema also offers versions that can be used as a café, office, workshop/studio, store, or a classroom. These have slightly different interior layouts, and do not all cost the same. The firm is currently also working on a stackable version of the Koda, and is planning on building a village of Koda homes in Tallinn, Estonia to be completed this August. This is part of their vision that the Koda home be used as an affordable housing solution.

The company ships to the UK, but not to North America, which it hopefully will in the near future. The home is quite pricy though, since the fully equipped version costs around $194,000.

Low-Carbon Concrete Products to be Developed by Atlas Block and CarbonCure

Atlas Concrete Carbon Neutral Block

Atlas Block, a manufacturer of concrete products based in Ontario, has signed a licensing agreement with CarbonCure, an emerging leader in science-based concrete technology for green building, to manufacture low-carbon concrete that will significantly reduce the carbon footprint of the concrete industry.

Several months have been spent testing the bolt-on technology from CarbonCure at the Atlas Block Hillsdale plant. The method sequesters carbon dioxide into the concrete during the manufacturing process. CO2 waste is consumed during concrete production to transform it into solid limestone, thus creating a better concrete product.

“This could transform the entire concrete industry,” said Don Gordon, CEO of Atlas Block. “I’ve been in this industry many years. This is easily the most exciting technological improvement I’ve seen.” Concrete is responsible for approximately 5 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions as the most widely used construction material.

Several major firms are beginning to spec the Atlas Block products, including B+H Architects. “B+H Architects is so impressed with the environmental sustainability of this technology that Atlas Block with CarbonCure products will be exclusively specified on all new products,” said Matthew Roberts of B+H Architects.

Atlas Block joins CarbonCure distributors, The Shaw Group of Nova Scotia, and Basalite Concrete Products of Dixon, California to meet the global demand for innovative green building materials.

Atlas Concrete Production

http://youtu.be/K9wupS_hESA

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