Solar panel recycling market to hit $270 million by 2023

solar panel recycling

According to the market research report published by P&S Market Research, global solar panel recycling market is projected to reach $269.8 million by 2023, increasing support of the government toward sustainable development and growing adoption of solar power as a renewable source of energy are the major factors driving the growth of the market. Solar panel recycling is the processing of photovoltaic (PV) systems or panels to obtain their constituent parts, which can be reused in the manufacturing of other products.

In terms of value, mechanical process held the largest share in the solar panel recycling market during the historical period and is estimated to contribute more than 55.0% share to the market in 2017. This can be attributed to the fact that the process is highly efficient and environmentally safe.

During the forecast period, thin-film PV recycling is expected to be the fastest-growing category in the solar panel recycling market, with a CAGR of 29.7 percent in value terms. The advantageous properties of thin-film solar panels, such as flexibility, light weight, and temperature resistance, are expected to drive their recycling market in the coming years.

In terms of revenue, the early-loss shelf life category of solar panels is estimated to contribute more than 80.0% share to the solar panel recycling market in 2017. This can be attributed to the increased use of these panels for recycling purposes due to factors such as exposure to harsh weather conditions and lack of routine maintenance.
During the forecast period, the solar panel recycling market is projected to witness the fastest growth in terms of value in APAC. Growing environment sustainability concerns and cost advantage of solar panel recycling in emerging economies, such as China and India, are expected to foster the market growth in APAC in the coming years.

The average lifespan of solar panels is 30 years, but some may suffer an early loss, resulting in a large amount of e-waste generation containing environmentally harmful substances. Thus, the recycling of these solar panels becomes important, as it helps in maintaining the ecological balance and reducing the emission of various hazardous substances into the atmosphere. The above-mentioned factors indicate that the increasing popularity of solar energy as a renewable power source is driving the growth of the solar panel recycling market.

— Solar Builder magazine

Aw Snap: We look at the Solar Raceway wire management solution

solar raceway

Fresh eyes are valuable every now and then. That was the position New York Manufacturing found itself in when it was approached by a large building products company to assist with its wire management needs. Their solar installations were continually plagued by one common theme: wire management. Like many other solar companies before them, their only choice was to manage wire using PVC cable trays or an extremely labor intensive EMT conduit. PVC can become brittle in a strong UV environment and it’s also a liability in fire prevention scenarios. Surely there was something better.

New York Manufacturing actively sought out feedback from dozens of solar installers, electricians and roofing experts. Based on the industry’s input, the company started to piece together a solution. The number one feature sought out was the ability to have an open tray, drop-in system. While electricians and installers love their job, they do not enjoy the hurdles of pulling wires. Electricians also expressed a need to armor wires from damage whether it be physical, weather or pesky rodents.

The result of these conversations was, Solar Raceway, has grown to become a complete wire management solution for the solar industry. Let’s look and see how it addresses the issues.

Pop the top off

So, something tough that both protects wires and doesn’t require wire pulling. It sounds like a bad riddle but after seeing Solar Raceway, the solution seems obvious.

The material choice was easy. To hold up in the wide variety of environments and elements that PV systems are exposed to, anodized aluminum extrusion was the best choice — a material with a high salt rating that is light weight and recyclable that will last years past the life expectancy of the modules themselves.

With Solar Raceway, the only bill of material items needed are the base, the bottom tray and the cover. Each component is designed to snap and lock into each other. Once the base is attached you would then snap the bottom tray into position. Now it’s time to drop your wires in and snap the top cover in place. Done.

The closed system is secure, while offering protection from the elements and rodents, but the top can be quickly removed for maintenance access. Picture an installer snapping in the trays, laying out the wiring of the entire system, testing everything and then snapping in the covers as a final step. Even if you don’t wait until the end, or find a connector issue down the road, the covers can be popped off to address any issues.

Versatility is another key benefit of the system. “We wanted it to be designed so that it can go up a wall vertically,” says Sal Anselmo, president of Solar Raceway. “We have a slot within the raceway in which the supplied wire retainer clips can be located, so you can take it from the roof, go off a rise area and continue, even install it upside down.”

The tough exterior doesn’t mean rigidity. Chad Carta, COO of Solar Raceway, says the Raceway comes in three sizes (1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 in.), two lengths (8 and 12 ft) and is agnostic to racking and module selection. So, there are many options in terms of layout. The size will depend on how you are using the raceway and what fill ratio will be needed. The 1.5-in. size was launched this year and came about due to a demand from smaller arrays and cross-between. On the other end, if you need 5 in. of diameter, two systems can be run side by side to accommodate that need.

“Some installers use it as a pure conduit replacement because they are tired of pulling wires and run it all the way down the back of the array,” Carta says. “Or some use a larger size and run perpendicular to the array where all of the wires that clipped on the backside of the panel feed to one central tray that will run back to the inverter.”

The Solar Raceway is already moving beyond rooftops. One no-brainer segment is carports if for no other reason than the aesthetics and how easy it is to install upside down. But it’s also finding a home in ground-mount systems.

“We’ve been surprised by the interest in ground mount applications,” Carta says. “These are projects that need to meet certain codes depending on the state or village, and they don’t like hanging wires or leaving them unprotected. This system protects the wires, so they don’t have to put a fence around the site. We were able to reduce the wire management for a large ground-mount system by 50 percent — run right down the middle, tied in with the rubber grommets and then just a short lead from the J-boxes.”

For more info on the newest inverters on the market download our free 2018 Inverter Buyer’s Guide

— Solar Builder magazine

New Button Mount with Cable Tie and Locking Clamp now available from HellermannTyton

Button_Mount_With_Cable_Tie_HellermannTyton

HellermannTyton, a specialist in the design and manufacture of robust solar fasteners, announces a high-performance Button Mount with Cable Tie and Locking Clamp. The two products fit the predrilled holes of most solar modules. They are rated for extended life in demanding outdoor environments and available for immediate shipping.

The Button Mount with Cable Tie fits most module holes and requires zero insertion force. Once placed through the module’s frame, installers can insert the included Solar Tie through the mount on the frame’s opposite surface.

The Locking Clamp fully closes and locks over a cable bundle. This fastener features an integrated fir tree mount for easy installation and includes a saddle for adding an optional Solar Tie and extending its bundle capacity. Designed with single-axis trackers in mind, it demonstrates exceptional extraction resistance.

RELATED: Heyco introduces four new cable tie products

SOLAR_Locking_Clamp_HellermannTyton

“Many installers run standard cable ties directly through sharp module holes, probably because it’s fast and easy; but unfortunately, those ties will fail prematurely,” said Product Marketing Manager – Energies Nick Korth. “So, we made these mounts easy to install but tough enough to withstand sun, wind and movement within module holes for years.”

Both products fit holes from 9×12 mm to 9×14 mm and can manage several cables. They are manufactured of high impact modified, heat-resistant, UV stabilized material, which is ideal for long-term performance in the full range of weather and climate extremes.

Full brochure is located right here.

— Solar Builder magazine

Trina Solar acquires a controlling interest in tracker company Nclave

NClave solar tracker

NClave solar tracker in Panama

Trina Solar, a Chinese supplier of global solutions for the solar sector, has reached an agreement to acquire a controlling interest in Nclave. This agreement consolidates the strategic one signed this March between both companies, which was an engagement to jointly develop, commercialize and install integral solutions for the photovoltaic sector with Nclave’s advanced photovoltaic tracker.

This corporate transaction reinforces Nclave’s position in the photovoltaic tracker market; and boosts the company’s growth plans established in its strategic plan, increasing its already wide client portfolio and improving its global positioning.

Trina Solar Limited, founded in 1997, is one of the leading companies in the solar sector worldwide. Nowadays, the company is immersed in an ambitious transformation process with the aim of becoming one of the main suppliers of global solutions in the solar sector. The company´s leading position in the industry is based on innovation excellence, high quality products, vertically integrated capacities and an environmentally efficient responsible management.

RELATED: Trina Solar hits 25.04 percent efficiency for large-area IBC mono-crystalline silicon solar cell

This March and, on the year of the company’s twentieth anniversary, Trina Solar launched TrinaPro solution, offering an optimized integration of modules-trackers-inverter, with the objective of reducing the LCOE for photovoltaic installations. Nclave will design and integrate trackers and solar structures within TrinaPro intelligent solutions.

About Nclave

Nclave was founded by the Clavijo Family and integrated the company MFV in 2017 together with the participation of the fund Q-Growth. Nclave has over 12 years of experience in renewable energy sources, having provided more than 2.5 GW worldwide. It currently has its headquarters in Madrid (Spain), commercial offices in five continents and manufacturing facilities in Navarra (Spain).

Nclave is a leading company in the development, design, manufacturing, installation and maintenance of fixed structures and photovoltaic solar trackers, including dimensioning and implementing of all foundation solutions. Nclave offers the widest range of products in the market (fixed structures and single and multi row trackers with any configuration), being adaptable to all kinds of project through solutions with minimum investment cost; as well as operation and maintenance.

— Solar Builder magazine

Details on the largest landfill solar project in Ohio now being constructed

Conti solar ohio parklands

PSE&G Parklands landfill ground array completed by Conti.

Conti Solar, a national solar engineering, procurement and construction (EPC), O&M and energy storage development company, has begun construction on the largest landfill solar project in Ohio. Located in Cuyahoga County, the 4 MW project is owned and operated by IGS Solar, a commercial and residential solar provider and an affiliate company of IGS Energy, one of the largest independent retail energy suppliers in the country. The solar project was developed by Enerlogics and McDonald Hopkins, and when complete, will provide over 5,000,000 kilowatt hours of clean solar electricity to county-owned facilities annually.

Solar projects built on landfills can be particularly complex, but Conti Solar has successfully installed more than 133 MW of landfill solar projects across the country. Their deep experience and knowledge with the processes and risks of landfill projects, along with their competitive buying power and superior execution capabilities establishes Conti Solar as a national leader in the segment.

RELATED: Mounting Challenges: Landfills, Brownfields, Water-Saturated Sites

Financing

The Cuyahoga solar project is the first of its kind in Ohio. Covering 17 acres of previously unproductive land, Conti Solar will manage the construction of the solar array that will sit atop a closed-and-capped landfill and transform an area of waste into a sustainable solar power generation plant. The project will be a cornerstone of Cuyahoga County’s sustainable practices. Via a power purchase agreement (PPA), Cuyahoga County will acquire 100 percent of the project’s energy through Cleveland Public Power. Benefits of this unique project include significantly reduced energy costs for the county, additional tax revenue, and an estimated 100 local jobs.

“It was essential that we partnered with a firm that has a proven track record in developing solar projects on top of sensitive landfill sites,” said Patrick Smith, vice president of IGS Solar. “It’s a unique niche, but Conti Solar’s vast experience, impeccable standards, and understanding of IGS Solar’s vision for the community has made Conti Solar the ideal partner for this project.”

“IGS Solar is helping Cuyahoga County reduce energy costs for the next 20 years. They have been a reliable energy partner supporting the efficient and cost-effective addition of clean renewable energy for the county’s benefit, both environmentally and financially, said Matthew Skidmore, CEO of Conti Solar. “We hope to continue working with IGS Solar on projects like this in Ohio and other Midwestern states.”

— Solar Builder magazine