Tiny Home That Offers Plenty of Storage Space

Tiny homes are all about downsizing, and in the beginning of the movement that meant getting rid of everything but the bare essentials when it comes to clothes and other material possessions. But with some clever design techniques this is no longer the case. And the newly constructed Juniper house proves that even a very small house can pack a lot of storage.

Juniper house was built by Backcountry Tiny Homes, and they created this home for Alexis and Brian of Living the Tiny Dream. The home measures 290 sq ft (27 sq m) (which includes the lofts) and features an advanced form of framing known as ladder framing, which reduces material costs and weight, as well as limits thermal bridging. It also makes the process of insulating the home easier. Beetle-kill pine was used in the construction process.

The interior of the home features a large multi-purpose unit, so to speak, which was made for IKEA parts and contains a transforming seating area and foldaway table. The seating area also features a hidden coffee table and ottoman, which can be rolled under the sofa when not needed.

The bedroom is located in a loft, which is accessible via a set of stairs with integrated storage space. There is also an elevated platform here for storing shoes, while there is additional storage space hidden in the floor of the loft.

The kitchen is located under the sleeping loft and is fitted with a large sink and refrigerator, as well as an all-in-one washer, and plenty of pantry space. The bathroom features a shower and composting toilet, while the ladder leading up to the second, so-called “reading loft,” is incorporated into its door to save space.

In an effort to save money, Alexis and Brian assisted in the construction of their tiny home, which also meant that they learned a few things along the way. Because of this the total cost of the home was only $53,800, which includes all the furnishings and appliances.

Capsule Hotel Makes Layovers More Comfortable at an Italian Airport

Flying is anything but great for the environment, but it has become pretty much unavoidable. It has also become a lot less comfortable than it used to be just 20 years ago. Prices have gone up, seats have gotten smaller, and layovers can sometimes last a day if we wish to book the cheapest possible flight. During these layovers, a lot of people opt to sleep somewhere in the airport instead of booking a hotel, which together with transportation to and from the airport can get pricy. These kinds of sleeping arrangements are usually not very comfortable. Not so at the Naples International Airport though.

The local design firm Carlotta Tartarone and Studiotre has created and installed the so-called Bed and Boarding (or BenBo) capsule hotel in the Naples airport. The idea came from the Japanese capsule hotels located at Tokyo airport that offer cheap, basic accommodation to travelers. The BenBo is located right at the airport, and never closes. The pods it’s made up of can be rented out to get some sleep in between legs of travel, or for just an hour to shower and change before continuing on with the journey.

Each capsule measures 43 sq ft (4 sq m) and is equipped with an automated door and soundproof walls. The furnishings in each capsule are basic and include a bed, storage cabinets, a mirror, a workstation, and free Wi-Fi. Two of the capsules are also wheelchair-accessible. Each guest has access to a private bathroom with shower, which is not attached to the capsule they are renting. Part of the hotel is also a well-lit common space, which effectively ties the capsules together and provides a space where guests can socialize or work.

As for the prices, you can rent a BenBo capsule for $9 for the first hour, $8 for the second hour, while a 9-hour stay will set you back $28. Future plans include building similar hostels at the airports in Rome, Bergamo and Palermo. They are also planning to enlarge the current BenBo hostel in Naples to include 30 two-room capsules.

London Micro Apartment Transformed Into a Cozy Home

In many cities across the globe, the shortage of affordable apartments has led to more and more people living in micro, or shoe-box apartments. London is one of the cities facing the worst of this housing shortage crisis, and the local architecture studio CIAO recently redesigned a tiny apartment into a spacious home, which is now big enough to host guests.

The apartment in question measures just 376 sq ft (35 sq m) and is located in a Victorian-era house in the Islington area. The apartment has high ceilings which is a plus when it comes to micro apartments. They kept the layout of the home open and with the help of clever convertible furniture they were able to transform this place into a comfortable home. The workspace which the client uses during the day can be transformed into a sleeping area for guests when needed with the help of a pull-out trundle bed. The lounge is also in this area, and features a corner sofa.

A half-height bookcase separates the main living area from the bedroom. The bed is placed atop a custom-built platform which hides the roll-out trundle guest bed. The platform is accessible via a couple of stairs which contain storage drawers. Higher up, in the mezzanine area there is another, larger storage space. The home also features a small, but functional bathroom.

The apartment also features a kitchen, which is fitted with lots of metallic COR-TEN steel that gives it an interesting industrial look. This look is nicely balanced by the warmer, natural wood elements elsewhere in the apartment, such as the table and shelving, as well as the brick wall in the living area which was left in it’s original condition.

This is definitely another prime example of how even a micro apartment can be transformed into a comfortable home with a few clever space saving techniques, and some outside the box thinking.

Tiny Minimalist Home

The firm Escape has been making tiny homes for a while now, and their latest offering, the so-called Escape One, is just as well built as all the others. It features a charred wood façade and an interior layout that maximizes the available space in the most thoughtful way possible.

The Escape One is built atop a 25 ft (7.62 m)-long trailer and measures 276 sq ft (25.6 sq m). The home is clad in wood throughout, and the exterior cladding was treated with the traditional Japanese Shou Sugi Ban method, which both preserves the wood and protects it from pests and decay naturally. The interior walls are also clad in wood, but these were left in their natural state.

As is the case with most tiny home builds, the interior was kept simple. The ground floor features a sitting area, a spacious kitchen, and a bathroom. The kitchen features a good amount of counter space and shelving, as well as a stove, sink and fridge. The bathroom is large enough to fit a toilet, sink and shower. The bedroom is located in a loft, which is accessible via a set of stairs. There appears to be a lot of headroom here, especially if the bed is low. There is also a second loft above the bathroom, which can be used for storage.

The home is very well insulated and has an average R-rating of R-30. The lighting is LED throughout, and while the base model features a standard RV hookup, a solar power system is an option. Other off-the-grid optional add-ons include water storage, and a composting toilet package. Customers can also opt to install a mini-split air-conditioning unit with a heat pump, and a propane furnace for heating. Luxury items such as a flatscreen TV with Blu-ray, stone countertops, and more are also available as an add-on to the base model.

Prices for the Escape One start at $49,800, which is quite a bargain.

French Tiny Home is Not as Small as it Looks

In France, laws require tiny homes to be smaller and lighter than the ones in the US. For this reason, it is downright impressive just how cozy and spacious the tiny home La Bohème which was recently designed by the firm La Baluchon, actually is. They packed a lot into a very small space without sacrificing comfort, which was quite a feat.

La Bohème tiny home rests atop a double axle trailer and is only 19.6 ft (6 m) long. it is made of wood, and features a bright green roof, which is an interesting choice, to say the least. The tiny home also has plenty of glazing, which lets in lots of light and doubtlessly aids ventilation. An interesting touch is the narrow window above the door, which is where the sleeping loft is located.

The ground floor of the home was left open and features a living area, kitchen and dining area. The living area is fitted with a sofa bed, that sleeps two, while the dining table can sit up to four people. The kitchen is equipped with a fridge and a propane-powered stove, as well as a sink and a fair amount of counter space.

The bathroom is fitted with just a toilet and shower, since the owner deemed that the kitchen sink was sufficient. The bedroom is in a loft, and is accessible via a ladder. There isn’t a lot of headroom here, but the windows let in plenty of light so it doesn’t feel as cramped.

La Bohème has a typical RV-style hookup for it’s electricity needs, while they installed LED lighting throughout to make it as energy efficient as possible. For insulation they used natural materials, namely cotton in the floors, a mix of linen, hemp and cotton in the walls, and wood fiber in the ceiling.

La Bohème is located in the picturesque Vendée region of France and the owner lives in it full-time. It cost about $70,500 to build.