AET accounts for 145 mph winds in 5-MW installation in Puerto Rico

Applied Energy Technologies (AET) completed a 5 MW solar installation project with Rosendin Construction Puerto Rico, LLC in Juncos, Puerto Rico. The modules installed for the project are Hanwha Q Cells 300W. The project will bring power to a Medtronic Pharmaceuticals facility.

APPLIED ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES (AET) LOGO“It is a privilege to be selected for another project in the Caribbean and South American market,” said Aaron Faust, VP of Business Development for AET. “Our engineering team is earning its reputation for providing thorough analysis so that every component of a project is taken into consideration to ensure quality, while also keeping costs down for the customer.”

For this particular project, AET’s engineering team had to account for 145 miles per hour wind load, a higher than average wind load for solar systems. With AET’s Rayport-G ECO wind tunnel test, they were able to optimize the posts of the system to save on cost, while upholding quality system engineering for the project. The system features a 2-high portrait design optimized for maximum panels and load tilt angle of 10 degrees.

RELATED: Problem Solvers: Solar site issues solved by the right mounting solution 

“AET was a clear choice for this project because of their experience in managing and delivering utility-scale projects,” said Ronald Hopgood, Division Manager of Rosendin. “AET’s system is backed by their expert engineering and wind tunnel analysis, making their system an ideal fit for the unique site conditions of this project.”

AET’s Rayport ECO product portfolio includes both rooftop and ground mount racking solutions made of fully galvanized steel. Customers are able to save money and installation time with AET’s ECO line of lightweight and high quality solar mounting solutions.

— Solar Builder magazine

2016 Solar Mounting/Racking Guide: Product Showcase

PV mounting solutions

Photo credit: EcoFasten Solar

Most of you may have learned that the earth is not flat. Which is too bad, really. If it was flat, we’d just place PV panels all over it and call it a day. Our Mounting Guide would certainly be a lot less interesting.

But no, of course it isn’t flat. It’s not even round, really. It’s hilly and bumpy and slanted and hard and soft. It’s also full of wind and falling water and ice. And sometimes, when the gods are bored, the ground literally quakes. And that’s just on one site.

Somehow, on top of all that, we are now installing GWs of renewable energy. How is it even possible? Why, mounting and racking solutions, certainly help. Below is a guide to many of today’s top mounting/racking companies, the services they offer and a standout product in their lineup. And if you missed any of our other Mounting Guide articles this year, check those out too:

 

Roof-Tech

Roof Tech’s RT-[E] Mount

RT- [E] Mount is a compact, versatile rail-less PV mounting system. Simply attach the RT-[E] Mount to the rafters or anywhere else on roof decking. Once the panels are fastened, the system array is electrically bonded. RT-[E] Mount comes complete with RT Butyl flashing, renowned for its watertight performance and durability. PE stamped certification letters available: UL 2703, ICC ESR-3575, ASTM 2140, Fully Waterproof.

Lineup Snapshot

Residential
C&I
Utility
Roof-mounts
Ground-mounts

X
X
X

Types: Rail-free

Website: www.roof-tech.us
Contact: info@roof-tech.us

RELATED: Mounting with butyl rubber: How Roof Tech gets a leak-proof seal 

 

Spice-Solar

Spice Solar’s complete system

Spice Solar has developed a complete system that reduces parts and rooftop installation time on all roof types and all wind/snow zones. No more racking, mid and end clamps, transporting 20-ft rails, sawing, splicing and grounding — not to mention all the purchasing, inventory and logistics hassles that go along with this blizzard of rooftop parts.

Residential
C&I
Utility
Roof-mounts
Ground-mounts

X
X

Types: Integrated racking

Engineering Services: Layout/design

Website: www.spicesolar.com
Contact: info@spicesolar.com

 

 

NEW-SolarRoofHook-ProductSolarRoofHook’s All Tile Adjustable Roof Hook

SolarRoofHook’s All Tile Adjustable Roof Hook is the leading mounting hardware for clay and concrete tile roofs in the industry. It is designed to work with a variety of tile sizes and types, including both flat and Spanish tile roofs. This hook has three points of adjustability and is compatible with all major racking manufacturers, accepting 5/16 in. or 3/8 in. bolts.

Residential
C&I
Utility
Roof-mounts
Ground-mounts

X
X

Types: Rack-mount, hooks

Website: www.solarroofhook.com
Contact: jwiener@quickscrews.com

 

NEW-ECOFASTENEcoFasten’s Rail-Free Rock-It System

With the top-down leveling of EcoFasten Solar’s rail-free Rock-It System, the installer can level as they go or after the install. Also, the extensive EcoFasten line of patented watertight solar roof mounts is comprised of a series of product systems characterized by roof-type application. Each system can be paired with a wide variety of brackets, allowing installers to attach EcoFasten Solar roof mounts to virtually any racking option.

Residential
C&I
Utility
Roof-mounts
Ground-mounts

X
X
X

Types: Structural, rail-free

Engineering Services: Layout/design

Website: www.ecofastensolar.com
Contact: (877) 859-3947

RELATED: Do you need a solar snow management system? 

 

CertainTeedCertainTeed’s Solstice System

CertainTeed’s Solstice System features high-efficiency, 60-cell monocrystalline or polycrystalline photovoltaic panels with power outputs from 260 W to 285 W. The rack-mounted modules are available in a variety of black and white frame and backsheet combinations. Solstice is also backed by CertainTeed’s equipment, power output and installation workmanship warranty — one of the most comprehensive in the industry.

 

Website: www.certainteed.com/roofing/solar

 

MagerackMagerack’s Solar Mounting System

The Magerack Solar Mounting System is a turn-key solar mounting solution that includes all components from the rail and clamps to roof attachments. The system is UL 2703 listed and has a Class A file rating with integrated bonding and grounding. In particular, its patented L-foot with flashing is easy to install and absolutely waterproof at a competitive price. Magerack will also have innovative rail-less mounting system available this year.

Residential
C&I
Utility
Roof-mounts
Ground-mounts

X
X

Types: Structural, hooks

Website: www.magerack.com
Contact: info@magerack.com

 

SnapNrackSnapNrack’s Series 100 Roof Mount System

The SnapNrack Series 100 Roof Mount System is engineered to optimize material use, labor resources and aesthetic appeal. The system boasts pre-assembled, stainless steel “Snap-In” hardware, watertight flash attachments and installs with a single tool. It is fully integrated with built-in wire management solutions for all roof types, one-size-fits-all features and can withstand extreme environmental conditions. It is listed to UL Standard 2703 for Grounding/Bonding, Fire Classification and Mechanical Loading.

Residential
C&I
Utility
Roof-mounts
Ground-mounts

X
X
X

Types: Rack-mount, hooks, fixed tilt

Engineering Support: Layout/design

Website: www.snapnrack.com
Contact: contact@snapnrack.com

 

Solar-SpeedrackSolar SpeedRack’s SpeedMount

Solar SpeedRack’s SpeedMount (UL 2703, 1703 and 467) is a shared rail system.  The black anodized aluminum rails are shipped pre-assembled and are adjustable to fit over 95 percent of the available modules. Its rail strength and spans are industry leading with roof penetrations further reduced by using its SpeedFoot, a non-penetrating load-bearing rail attachment making this system an ideal solution for high wind and/or snow loads. Through use of its calculator, available free of charge on its website, customers can design their project in portrait, landscape or a combination of both and produce an accurate bill of materials for the racking required.

Residential
C&I
Utility
Roof-mounts
Ground-mounts

X
X
X
X

Types: Rack-mount, fixed-tilt, carport

Engineering Support: Layout/design, geotech

Website: www.solarspeedrack.com
Contact: shane@solarspeedrack.com

 

QuickRack-systemQuick Mount PV’s Quick Rack

Quick Mount PV’s patented mounting system Quick Rack is a simple, cost-effective and elegant rail-free solar mounting system. Featuring QRack technology, the patented system is an integrated roof mount and racking system, engineered to be robust and structurally sound. The system works with standard module frames and comes with state-of-the-art design software. Quick Rack ships in small boxes, saving money on shipping and logistics. With no rails, installation is fast and simple with mounts-to-modules instead of mounts-to-rails-to-modules.

Residential
C&I
Utility
Roof-mounts
Ground-mounts

X
X

Types: Rack-mount, rail-free, hooks

Engineering Support: Layout/design, installation

Website: quickmountpv.com
Contact: sales@quickmountpv.com

Click 2 for rooftop commercial and ground-mount products

— Solar Builder magazine

AET adds east-west configuration to Rayport-B ECO system line

AETs-Rayport-B-ECO-East-West-System
Applied Energy Technologies (AET) expanded its ECO line of products with its Rayport-B ECO East-West System. AET’s Rayport-B ECO East-West System provides an east/west orientation to maximize PV production and increase array density on the rooftop.

East to west orientation provides advantages for PV power production with a dynamic grid. With greater array density, the system provides dual exposure during peak PV production times.

“For many rooftop installations, an east-west orientation yields much better results in PV production,” said Aaron Faust, AET’s VP of Business Development. “It’s our goal to provide customers with a reliable, high-quality and cost-effective racking solution that supports system optimization.”

AET’s engineers design each product to be functional, lightweight, durable and cost-effective. The Rayport-B ECO East-West System, like its family of ECO products, is constructed from galvanized steel. It has one common bolt for all joints and has panel clamps with integrated grounding. The Rayport-B ECO System is wind tunnel tested, UL 2703 listed and comes with a 25-year limited warranty.

RELATED: Load Warriors: Experts discuss rooftop ballast installation best practices 

— Solar Builder magazine

Load Warriors: Experts discuss rooftop ballast installation best practices

ballast PV roof mount

Photo credit: PanelClaw’s Polar Bear Mounting System and project developer Nexamp.

Installing a ballast racking system on a commercial roof isn’t necessarily any easier or more difficult than a ground-mount in terms of the planning and challenges, but you can’t accidentally void the earth’s warranty. There’s also less risk in a ground-mount mistake resulting in a PV system tumbling into a parking lot or street. Best practices for installing a rooftop ballast system begin with accounting for these factors.

That roof has a story; it exists within context. The age of a building will reveal the building code it was designed to, which then reveals the additional capacity — and how much load a roof can hold is the determining factor in knowing if PV is an option.

For example, a building constructed in the ’50s, ’60s or ’70s can often be a better candidate for PV than one more recently constructed. Older buildings usually have strong steel truss structures that are better for holding additional load. “There was a period of time when building codes dropped and people cheaped out on the roof,” said Andrew Worden, CEO of GameChange Solar. “They became more lightweight and were designed to support the minimum load and not an ounce more. So, for solar, these are not practical.”

The time period in particular that worries Worden are buildings 15 to 20 years old. “If they are 5 to 10 years old, they are probably OK.” But then again, some older panelized wood roofs have to be evaluated carefully.

This isn’t to call out building engineers; they have their own economic factors to consider, and 20 years ago, the wide spread adoption of commercial rooftop PV wasn’t part of the decision-making. In 2016, those considerations are changing. California building codes highlight a particular conundrum concerning ballast systems. California is the mecca of PV in the United States, but it’s also the mecca of seismic activity. This leads to both stronger roof codes and more caution, and the code itself isn’t completely clear on what to do with ballast. This grey area is just now starting to color in.

“It’s amiss that people think they aren’t allowed to do ballast in seismic areas and that you have to attach,” says Rob Ward, head engineer at SunLink. Ward is part of a committee to make the code clearer. “Some jurisdictions have been resistant, saying they will not allow ballast systems on the roof because they are too dangerous. SunLink has done a lot of testing, so we said here’s the analysis and the truth to it: it’s safe, and it can be allowed.” SunLink became the first company to install a ballast system in LA County.

Many of the top mounting/racking companies are similarly involved in working with codes and standards bodies across the country to get everyone on the same page, which is part proving the point that ballast is safe, and part promotion of the standards that make up a quality, safe rooftop ballast system. To that latter point, code considerations are intimately linked to the systems selected — have those systems been tested? Will they stand up to scrutiny and the elements?

PanelClaw, which is solely focused on rooftop ballast work, is dedicated to spreading this message, from the new SEIA committee, to the structural engineers of California (SEAOC) to the ASME.

“For example, until recently, the UL mechanical load test was putting sand bags on top of a panel, attaching it to the racking, letting it sit for 30 minutes, flipping it, doing it again and doing that six times. Then you get a mechanical loading listing with UL,” says Constantino Nicolaou, CEO at PanelClaw. “Well, most roofs aren’t flat. So if you test that on an incline, you might find some of your racking connections are not strong enough, which can lead to problems down the road.”

RELATED: PanelClaw, PVComplete team up for commercial solar rooftop design software

Nicolaou thinks the solution starts with developers and EPCs asking the right questions. “If the codes and standards don’t exist, then developers and EPCs need to hammer the racking companies on what testing they are doing beyond UL and wind, and that’s how the industry can self-police. Who is running the wind program? Who is doing the ballasting? What is the methodology? What are your safety factors? What are the design guidelines like? Installers need to ask more questions.”

commercial roof PV solar

Photo credit: PanelClaw’s Polar Bear Mounting System and project developer Nexamp

In general, getting out to the site and physically seeing the roof is the most important step. On the one hand, it is the easiest step – just go and look. But in a competitive job-bidding environment, this step is often put off until later in the process. There may not be a way around it, but this workflow will naturally lead to revisions of initial designs in the best of scenarios. Google Earth will only get you so far.

Aaron Faust, VP of business development for Applied Energy Technologies (AET), sees this a lot. “They have to make a best case scenario to get those [proposals] out, but then once the project starts to come to fruition you know it’s going to be a problem. Sometimes it’s through no fault of their own. Once they get under the roof to see what it’s capable of holding and what’s really up there in terms of obstructions, that’s where the changes come in.”

There have been many times where AET has delivered product to the site only to then hear a structural engineer say the roof can’t hold what’s been spec’d out.

“The initial design can change, so it’s up to us to work with the customer to design the system to optimize or minimize cost and loading,” Faust says.

This is where choosing the right mounting company for the job could pay off with additional services, such as site surveying and engineering. Bottom line, no rule of thumb will be the key to judging a roof, so every job needs a building engineer to look at the roof on site and at drawings of how the building is framed.

OK, I’m on the roof — now what?

Nicolaou says start with your setbacks from roof edges and then map the obstructions for shading. Look for fire code or walkway considerations. Get underneath and check the roof membrane. What is the roof composition? Do its chemical properties clash with the racking materials? A limiting factor to consider is pitch. Nicolaou looks for 5 percent pitch or less.

“Beyond 5 percent, up to 7 degrees, you’re looking at a combination of ballast and attached or just fully attached,” he says.

Next, are there parapets? These are the short walls around a roof’s edge, and they have a big impact on wind. We will get to them in a minute.

“There will be cricketing — sloped areas around the parapets that help the water drain,” Ward said. “Those can be at a steeper slope, so you’ll want to understand the changes in pitch on the roof and some of those details.”

Understand the roof’s drainage. Extra dead load on a roof will cause some additional deflection of the roof framing. “You may be trading off some of the roof’s live load capacity to take the extra dead load of the array, so ponding and drainage are more important and need to be looked at by the building engineer,” Ward said.

Software can play a big role in your system design. PanelClaw, for example, developed a partnership with PVComplete to have its system geometry preloaded in the software. Once the roof is mapped, the software allows you to superimpose multiple tilt angles, configurations, row spacing and string options and then compare them all side by side.

Understanding Wind

Back to those parapets. Even though they look like walls, and walls theoretically obstruct oncoming elements, parapets have the opposite effect on wind.

“Wind goes to negative pressure,” Worden explains. “So, wind comes over the top of the parapet and wants to go down in the space underneath it, and it forms a mini tornado.”

A small, high roof with parapets is going to really test the stability of your install. There could be 500 lbs of uplift in the corners but only 50 lbs in the middle. This informs how much ballast you need and where. The same calculations made to adjust for parapets need to be applied to wind deflectors.

RELATED: How to Protect PV Systems From the Worst Weather 

“You need to keep the wind from not only going under the panel from behind, but also make sure it doesn’t grab on to the panels,” Worden says. “You need the wind deflector pretty far behind because wind will go up over the deflector and go to negative pressure on top of the panel and suck on the panel. You need it back so there is a space of a few inches so it is making a little eddy in the space between the wind deflector and panel. It’s weird, but that’s the best way.”

Comprehensive wind tunnel testing will reveal a lot of these nuances and how a mounting system will respond. These reports start the plan of attack against wind, but more expertise is needed on top of that spreadsheet.

“You need experts in how to use that spreadsheet to generate ballast drawings. You need executives who make smart decisions about the risks they will take and not take based on the data they have,” Nicolaou says. “And that’s just wind.”

Seismic Consideration

As noted earlier, the permitting in seismic zones has been changing the last few years. Ward says there was always prescriptive language that systems in high seismic zones need to be attached to the building. That language wasn’t thinking about rooftop solar. Ward worked with the Structural Engineers Association in California to put guidelines out for unattached rooftop arrays that accounted for safe performance and met the building code.

“Those recommendations for 2012 are widely accepted in California and other high seismic areas, and those recommendations are proposed for the next round of the building code,” Ward says. So, while engineers are in agreement, until it is officially in the code, building owners might have an issue. “It’s tough to get stuff through that process, but that methodology is pretty well accepted at this point.”

In high seismic zones, you need a buffer around the array to account for potential displacement in the event of an earthquake.

Jobsite Efficiency

Once you are ready to install, the job is all about efficiency while staying flexible. For starters, Faust and Ward both recommend getting as much done on the ground as you can before heading to the roof. These are system dependent, but can include stuff like preassembling columns, prepanelizing modules or premounting modules in groups offsite.

On the roof, how efficient are you being when placing panels? Will panels in certain areas mean more components or weight because of your design? Faust recommends building a couple rows before putting panels on to allow for adjustments.

RELATED: Logistics power: AET delivers racking for 7-MW Calif. project in one week 

“No matter what system you are using, the way to really get the weight down is to make sure you have larger sections of panels,” Faust says. “Any small sections or peninsulas or islands always tend to have higher weight as far as the load required to hold them down.”

Wire management is usually simpler with ballast-only, but be sure to have that figured out ahead of time. Factors that could make wiring more difficult include racking with sharp edges or less than 2-in. clearance under the panels.

A lot of efficiency onsite is determined by the system you choose. Some may involve fewer components; some may have more preassembly; some may provide more flexibility to adjust for last-second surprises. If you have enough knowledge about the roof, selecting the right system will be much easier.

Chris Crowell is the managing editor of Solar Builder.

— Solar Builder magazine

AET expands Rayport-B ECO ballast system for Prism Bifacial panels

AETs-Rayport-B-Prism-System

Applied Energy Technologies (AET) has expanded its ECO line of products, introducing the Rayport-B ECO Prism Ballast System for Prism Solar Technologies Bifacial Solar Panels. Prism’s bifacial glass modules generate up to 25 percent more energy per watt than traditional modules in flat rooftop applications by utilizing the light reflected from a white or reflective commercial rooftop surface.

AET was selected by Prism to custom design a racking solution for its bifacial solar module product line.

“It’s our goal to grow with the industry as new technologies emerge,” said Aaron Faust, AET’s VP of Business Development. “Adapting our rooftop solution was a clear choice to provide customers with a reliable, cost-effective racking solution for bifacial panels.”

RELATED: AET adds ground-mount dealer kits to expanded ECO product line 

Prism Solar Technologies has been manufacturing bifacial solar modules since 2012. They are the only bifacial module manufacturer with a warranted backside power rating and the first module in the industry to meet NREL’s most stringent Qualification-Plus durability standard.

“With their reputation as a technically advanced racking supplier, AET was well positioned to address the needs of the commercial roof and solar marketplace,” said Jerry Hughes, Director of Sales and Marketing at Prism Solar. “AET customized their system to realize the additional ‘backside-gain’ for their customers who combine Prism modules with reflective rooftops. We are confident that the end result is a high quality system that achieves the additional bifacial-energy-gain and is easy to install.”

AET has been at the forefront in developing groundbreaking products that help bring solar energy to a wider audience. With an impeccable track record of 100% on time delivery, 100% on budget, and zero warranty claims, AET meets the highest standards in product manufacturing, design and engineering, and installation required by the solar industry’s foremost leaders.

For more information on AET’s Rayport-B ECO Prism Ballast System, visit their website.

— Solar Builder magazine