Micro apartment turned into a family home with transformer furniture

Using transformer units to make the most of the available space in small and micro apartments is not a new idea, but it’s always nice to see new approaches to it. One such is certainly this renovation by Spanish architect Angel Rico who turned a micro, 215 sq ft (20 sq m) apartment into a family home for three. He installed transformable, multi-functional elements and furniture, which makes this apartment much more spacious and comfortable.

The apartment is located right by the ocean, so one of the key considerations was maximizing the view. To achieve this, all the storage spaces, such as the closet, pantry and even the child’s bed have been placed on one side of the tiny space, and hidden inside a wall transformer unit. This wall has more than one layer. A part of it hinges out and reveals many smaller compartments, which are used to store various items to keep them out of the way. The child’s bed can also be hinged down then moved out of the way during the day.

The top of another part of this transformer wall can be unfolded to open up the kitchen, which can also be hidden away when not needed. The fridge is also stored inside this wall. The bathroom is separated from the rest of the space by another hinged wall, which is also a closet. This set up allows the occupants to shower and dress in the same space. Above the bathroom is a loft, which the mother uses to take naps in, since she works late shifts at the local hospital, though they might turn it into a kid’s bedroom eventually.

The living room features a sofa-bed, which is where the parents sleep. They also use this space for entertaining, since it can fit up to 11 guests. This is where they place the extendable table and chairs, which are otherwise hidden in a hatch in the ceiling. The apartment also has a balcony, which works to extend the living space of this micro apartment and makes it appear more spacious.

All in all, these renovations and clever uses of transformer furniture make this apartment appear much more spacious than it is.

Missile Silos Transformed into Fancy Disaster Survival Condos

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Survival is mankind’s most important goal, and now some of us will be able to do so in style and comfort. US-based Vivos Group is transforming former Atlas missile silos into luxury survival shelters, which will allow inhabitants to whether most forms of natural disasters. They’re building an entire network of these Survival Condos, and so far they have completed one entire such shelter, which is already fully booked.

They are currently working on a second and the entire project is a good example of repurposing a large foot-print structure into something usable.

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The Atlas missile silos were retired from military service a few years back, so they have been made available for other uses. The silos have 9 feet (2.7 m)-thick concrete walls, which can withstand a direct nuclear strike. The structure is also topped with a dome, which is capable of withstanding winds of up to 500 mph (805 km/h). By using existing missile silos to build the Survival Condos, Vivos Group managed to save about $120 million, which should make their units more affordable.

Each of the units is equipped with redundant electricity sources and a redundant water supply with a reserve tank of a minimum of 75,000 gal (341,000 l). The filtration systems in place are able to filter our biological, nuclear, and chemical agents, while there is also a medical center on-site. The structure is also equipped with organic hydroponic and aquaculture setups so the residents will be able to grow their own food.

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Residents of The Q Experience Luxurious James Bond Lifestyle with Solar Power

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“The Q” is an apartment building in the Little Italy neighborhood of San Diego, California (Jonathan Segal FAIA & Development Company), so named after the gadget-inventing character, Q, of James Bond movie fame. A gross square footage of 90,000 houses 29 residential units, between 400 and 1,900 square feet a piece, along with underground parking.

Green features of The Q include rooftop solar panels that power common areas, low-E glazing, and operable windows that allow for light and air to enter the building through “gill slits,” or angled fins, on the building’s north facade.

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To lighten the visual impact, the building volumes are transparent and clean-lined, and feature wrap-around glass that, from floor to ceiling, provides residents with dramatic views of the San Diego harbor and downtown skyline.

Rents range from $950 per month for studio apartments on up to $5,200 for two-bedroom duplex units. While these are above the average neighborhood prices, Segal was able to lease all of the units without difficulty. “We offered something different,” he said in an Architectural Record interview, “not boxes punched with holes, not transplanted suburban homes, but places that capitalize on the city experience.”

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Jonathan Segal is known as one of the most successful and pioneering residential architectural and development companies in downtown San Diego, with a reputation for building superior housing at competitive prices. His firm focuses on urban projects that range between 80 and 160 units per acre of land. The firm has won twenty-four local, state, and national AIA awards for residential and urban design.

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