Recycled Shipping Container House

It’s been awhile since we reported on a cool new shipping container home, but this awesome piece of cargotecture easily makes up for that. It’s called Kin Kin Container House and it was built using a disused shipping container that was already on the property when owner Troy Walker purchased it. Most of the interior furnishings are also made from recycled materials, so it’s an all-around winner. The home is located in Kin Kin, Queensland, Australia.

The shipping container forms just half of the total living area of this home. Troy began the transformation by first cutting out one of the longer sides of the container and he used the pieces to build a bathroom. The rest of the components of the home are also salvaged or recycled and include 1970s era jalousie windows and hardwood poles, as well as a bathroom sink and a fire pit that he constructed using a stainless steel beer keg.

The home has no insulation. The interior walls are finished with plywood, with many of the steel elements left exposed. The home is also covered by a large roof which shields it from the sun and therefore keeps the interior cooler. Troy located the recycled building materials online and at local salvage yards, which he admits was a very time consuming and even costly process.

The home features elements of so-called passive design, with the overhangs letting in the sun in the winter but blocking it out in the summer. It measures 967 sq ft (90 sq m) and features a spacious open plan living, dining and kitchen area, as well as a loft bedroom that has plenty of head room and is big enough to fit a king sized bed. The loft is accessible via a ladder. The home also features a spacious bathroom with a tub, toilet and sink.

The home is fitted with a hybrid solar power system, while the place is kept airy and cool thanks to the bi-fold glass doors and louvres. There is also spacious outdoor deck.

Troy is renting out the cabin via AirBnb and a single night’s stay costs about $70.

Tiny House That Has a Bathroom With a View

Tiny homes are more often than not built from scratch, which means that everything in them can be made exactly as the owner wants it. And the client who commissioned the firm Rewild Homes to build this tiny home for them wanted to have a bathroom big enough for a bathtub, as well as large windows so they can enjoy gazing at the surrounding nature as they bathe.

The home is called Kestrel, and it is a towable tiny home that rests atop a 24 ft (7.3 m)-long double axle trailer. The interior is quite simple and the layout was kept open to add to the feeling of spaciousness. It also features hardwood flooring, birch and fir trim cabinetry and plenty of glazing, which lets in lots of natural light and aids ventilation.

The living area is just to the side of the entrance, and features a bench-like sofa, which hides storage compartments. There is also a small storage loft above it. Next to this area is a kitchenette, which is equipped with a sink made of granite, a propane-powered stove, as well as a washer/dryer combo unit and even a small fridge.

The bathroom is located on one end of the home and is accessible via a pocket door. It’s fitted with a custom-made vanity unit and also has a granite sink and a granite countertop. It also features a composting toilet, and a bathtub/shower that is flanked by two windows. Privacy could be an issue, but the owners will probably install some blinds, or maybe they plan to live in a secluded area.

Above the bathroom is the sleeping loft, which is accessible via a storage stair. The loft has a low ceiling so there isn’t a lot of headroom here, but there is a skylight, which lets in lots of light, while the loft is big enough for a double bed.

The Kestrel gets electricity from an RV-type hookup, while hot water is provided by a propane-powered on-demand water heater. The home also features a forced air propane heater, and LED lighting was installed throughout.

There is no word on how much this home cost to build.

Solar Powered Concrete Home With a Green Roof

While concrete may not be a very sustainable material to work with when building houses, the newly completed MeMo House makes up for it in other green features. It is located in Buenos Aires, Argentina and was designed by the local firm Arquitectura.

The MeMo House measures a generous 2,314 sq ft (215 sq m), and is located on a narrow plot of land. It is a two story house, and the living room, dining room, and kitchen are located on the ground floor. The three bedroom and three bathrooms are located on the first floor, while the home also features a rooftop terrace and a spacious deck on the ground floor. The home has a green roof, as well as several greenery-filled areas throughout.

The walls inside the house are exposed concrete, which might not be ideal for everyone, but in the case of MeMo House it works, due to the ample amounts of greenery and natural wood. The rooms all feature large, floor-to-ceiling windows which let in plenty of natural daylight and allow for excellent cross ventilation. The borders between the indoor and outdoor spaces are also effectively blurred in this way. The windows are also fitted with large wooden shutters for when shade or privacy is needed.

While concrete may not be a very green building material, it does provide excellent thermal mass, so the home is quite energy efficient. The large windows ensure that all rooms in the house have enough light without needing to use electric lights. The home is also equipped with a rainwater collection system, and this water is used to irrigate the green areas of the home. A rooftop solar panel array harvests enough solar energy to lessen the home’s dependence on the grid considerably. The garden gate was made from leftover materials, while they made sure to compost all the biodegradable waste produced during construction.

French Tiny House Does More with Less

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When it comes to tiny homes, most of them already do more with less, but in France the laws governing how large a towable home can be to still be roadworthy are even more stringent. So the firm Blauchon, charged with designing this tiny home, had less to work with since the maximum dimensions of the house could only be 21 ft (6.5 m) long and 13 ft (4 m) high. They still managed to create a comfortable, permanent home for a family of three.

The tiny home is called Calypso, and it is clad in red cedar, with one section treated with the Japanese Shou Sugi Ban method, which seems to have been used for decorative purposes in this case, and not as a preservation method. Since the home is tiny indeed, they installed plenty of glazing to allow light to flood the interior and make it appear more spacious.

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Much of the interior is taken up by the living space, which features a kitchenette, a dining area, and storage space. The sofa also in this space hides a good amount of storage and can also be used as a guest bed. The kitchenette is fitted with a sink, stove, and fridge, and also has a breakfast bar large enough to sit three.

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The bathroom features a composting toilet and a shower, though there is no sink to save space. The family must use the kitchen sink for washing too. The child’s bedroom is also on the ground floor, and is separated off from the rest of the home by a door. The parent’s bedroom, on the other hand, is located in a loft that’s accessible by a ladder.

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The kid’s room is fitted with a raised bed that has two wardrobes under it, and can be accessed by a removable staircase that also has integrated storage for toys and such. They were also able to fit a small desk into the space, so the child can do their homework.

The home features standard hookups for electricity and water. For insulating the floor they used sheep’s wool, while cotton, linen and hemp was used to insulate the walls and wood fiber in the ceiling. The home features LED lighting throughout.

Unfortunately, there is no information as to how much this tiny house cost to build.

Fun Little Home

The French firm Baluchon recently unveiled a unique, fun new tiny home on wheels, which packs a lot into a small space. The home is very colorful, and would be a lot of fun to live in, I’m sure, especially given the fact that the interior is very well laid out.

The home is called Essen’Ciel and measures 19.6 ft (6 m) in length. It can still sleep up to four people and features a very spacious kitchen given the diminutive size of the home. The kitchen is equipped with a two-burner stove and a small fridge. It is located on the ground level of the Essen’Ciel, as is the sitting area, which is fitted with a sofa that can be pulled out into a bed. This space is divided in half by a staircase, which gives access to the sleeping loft. The latter is large enough to sleep two people comfortably, but doesn’t have an impressive amount of headroom. The staircase itself is very interesting, since the bottom two steps are retractable, which saves some space when the stairs aren’t in use.

To further make the most of the available space, the shelving in the living room is irregular and angular. In this way storage space is provided without sacrificing too much of the living area to it. The bathroom is small, but still large enough to fit a shower and toilet.

The Essen’Ciel was built atop a double-axle trailer and gets it’s power via a RV-style hookup. The exterior cladding is cedar, while they used sheep’s wool to insulate the floor, and cotton, linen and hemp for the walls. To insulate the ceiling they used wood fiber.

There is no word on price for this model yet, but other tiny homes made by Baluchon start at $65,000 (€60,000).