Get your proposals ready: New York sets first $6 million in funding for its grid modernization challenge

renewable energy funding

New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced the first round of funding for the $15 million Future Grid Challenge, a program to help solve technical challenges utilities face with energy transmission and distribution when integrating renewable energy resources into New York’s electric grid.

Administered by the New York State Energy Research Development Authority (NYSERDA), the Future Grid Challenge will offer funding to grid technology companies and research institutions that will address challenges ranging from the need for greater real-time system data to incorporating smart technologies and energy storage into power grid planning and operations. This initiative will have two rounds with each round addressing different challenge areas.

Modernizing the grid supports the Governor’s mandate for 70 percent renewable electricity by 2030 and a carbon-free power grid by 2040 as included in the historic climate legislation that was just passed by the legislature, the New York State Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act.

Where this $6 million is going

In this first round of funding, up to $6 million is available for projects that partner with Con Edison and Orange & Rockland utilities with up to $3 million available per utility challenge to support development of technical solutions. Proposals should focus on:

• Helping Con Ed advance Distributed Energy Resource (DER) monitoring, control, data analytics and advanced forecasting
• Assisting Orange and Rockland with improving smart inverter functionality to provide seamless integration of distributed resources, improve grid stability and reduce system losses

Proposals are due by October 9, 2019.

The remaining funds will be made available through the second round of the program later in 2019 with new challenges and utilities identified and included.

More on New York’s grid modernization

To prepare for this important initiative, NYSERDA’s Smart Grid team has worked with the Joint Utilities of New York members Con Edison, Central Hudson Gas & Electric, National Grid, New York State Electric and Gas, Rochester Gas and Electric, and Orange & Rockland to identify transmission and distribution challenges that each utility faces. Together, these utilities provide electric service to over 13 million households, businesses, and government facilities across New York State. Each specific challenge was developed in partnership with the utilities, and each utility will participate in the selection committee for their respective challenge. To be eligible for an award, proposals submitted must specifically address the unique challenges identified for the selected utilities.

“Our participation in the Future Grid Challenge will yield innovative solutions to help us make it even easier and more beneficial for our customers to choose renewables,” said Matthew Ketschke, Senior Vice President, Customer Energy Solutions, for Con Edison. “This program is an example of the private and public sectors in New York State working together to build the modern grid that is essential to creating the clean energy future we want.”

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The Future Grid Challenge funding complements other NYSERDA smart grid funding announced previously, including the $30 million announced to support projects that develop or improve electric grid products or technologies, as well as the $5 million made available to enhance and support the connection of renewable resources to the grid.

Since 2016, the program has awarded approximately $25 million under 55 contracts to grid technology companies and research organizations. A total of $110 million has been dedicated through 2022 under the Clean Energy Fund Grid Modernization Investment Plan to help modernize New York’s grid. Recent projects include low-cost high-accuracy grid sensors, modeling and simulation tools, and advanced engineering solutions for more effective integration of wind and solar power. Learn more on NYSERDA’s website.

— Solar Builder magazine

Siemens awarded $6.4M by DOE to develop solar’s role in grid resilience

solar corporate funding

Siemens’ central research and development unit in the U.S., Siemens Corporate Technology (CT) US, was selected for a $6.4 million research award from the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) to advance solar energy’s role in strengthening the resilience of the U.S. electricity grid. This project will create an innovative Energy Management System that can coordinate distributed microgrids to work together. The system will utilize diverse technologies to increase grid resilience against natural disasters or cyber-attacks as well as autonomously restore power during a blackout using smart inverters.

CT US was selected as a part of the Energy Department’s effort to invest in new projects that enable grid operators to rapidly detect physical and cyber-based abnormalities in the power system and utilize solar generation to recover quickly from power outages. Siemens is one of several projects that will develop grid management technologies that show how solar energy will enhance power system resilience, especially at critical infrastructure sites. Collaborative efforts between Siemens and the DOE are expected to begin by Summer 2019.

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“Siemens technologies are helping to modernize the U.S. electric grid and develop stronger, more resilient power systems that can detect and defend against physical and cyber-threats and support smart infrastructures,” said Ulrich Muenz, Siemens CT Head of the Autonomous Systems and Control Research Group. “This project advances innovative research and development for technologies that could one day become standard across the industry to enhance and protect critical infrastructure through autonomous and resilient energy management systems.”

The Siemens CT team will be led by Ulrich Muenz and Sindhu Suresh and work with partners from DOE’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Columbia University, Siemens Digital Grid and Holy Cross Energy to develop, validate, and demonstrate a highly innovative, three-layer Energy Management System (EMS) for Autonomous and Resilient Operation of Energy systems with RenewaAbles (AURORA).

In January 2019, CT signed an MOU with National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to conduct integrated experiments within their respective research and development facilities to help integrate innovative power electronic devices with the electric grid, including smart inverters for solar panels, batteries, and electrical vehicles that are capable of supporting the nation’s power system.

“The increasing deployment of distributed solar resources gives grid operators like Holy Cross Energy an opportunity to rethink the design and operation of our electric power system, in ways that utilize these local assets to not only deliver value to the consumer, but also to enable and enhance the reliability and resilience of the power systems in which they are embedded. By working with Siemens and collaborators in this very important project, we will get a window into the future self-driving grid and discover the most important steps we need to take to get ourselves ready for it,” says Bryan Hannegan, CEO of Holy Cross Energy.

— Solar Builder magazine

New report explores 10 grid reform concepts, case studies for utilities to consider

utility grid modernization

A frequent topic on this site over the last year is the need for more advanced utility business models and a new report from the Advanced Energy Economy and Rocky Mountain Institute echoes this sentiment, noting that advancing efficient and equitable approaches to update the utility business model is crucial to the grid’s transition to a more secure, clean and affordable customer-centric system.

In identifying, evaluating and encouraging innovation in business models, the report, Navigating Utility Business Model Reform: A Practical Guide to Regulatory Design, offers a menu of regulatory options for policymakers, utilities and electric customers to best support and manage the maturation of a 21st-century grid.

Powerful trends are impacting the contours of the electric system, including growing policy demands for improved environmental performance, the increasingly widespread availability of distributed energy resources like rooftop solar and storage, more customer demand for energy choice and the need for strengthened resilience in the face of more extreme weather across the country. Navigating Utility Business Model Reform offers electricity system leaders and stakeholders 10 reform options to best respond to these pressures and support policy and regulatory decision-making.

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“The grid is experiencing rapid changes in its shift to a 21st-century system, and electric utilities have a fundamental role to play in ensuring this transition strengthens resilience, improves environmental performance and protects the interests of customers while maintaining essential features of affordability and reliability,” Dan Cross-Call, a manager at RMI and one of the report’s authors, said. “This report offers a practical guide to industry leaders—regulators, utilities, grid operators, policymakers and policy influencers—on how to best engage with an increasingly decarbonized and distributed energy system, shepherding and managing this transition to maintain the fundamental role of utilities and achieve new policy objectives.”

The 10 reform options the report examines include revenue decoupling, platform revenues, performance-incentive mechanisms and multiyear rate plans, among others. In addition to Navigating Utility Business Model Reform, the three groups released a set of case studies providing current examples of utility business model reforms and the regulatory constructs that make them work.

The five case studies examine:

• Oklahoma’s Energy Efficiency Incentives—How Public Service Co. of Oklahoma and Oklahoma Gas & Electric are responding to shared savings and lost revenue adjustment mechanisms intended to remove the utilities’ financial disincentive to maximize customer energy efficiency opportunities.

• Maryland’s Behavioral Demand Response Program—How Baltimore Gas & Electric (BGE) lowered summertime demand driven by air-conditioning use through customer rebates for reducing consumption during peak-demand days, with BGE able to sell the energy and peak-demand reductions directly into the PJM wholesale market.

• Regulatory Accounting of Cloud Computing—How Illinois and New York are trying to level the playing field for service-based alternatives to traditional capital investments through the regulatory accounting treatment of software-as-a-service.

• Brooklyn Queens Demand Management Program—How Con Edison is deferring distribution infrastructure upgrades in an area of rising demand by deploying nontraditional methods of customer- and utility-side demand reduction, with the utility rewarded with performance incentives and accelerated depreciation.

• United Kingdom’s RIIO Performance-Based Framework for Driving Innovation and Delivering Value—How the UK’s Office of Gas and Electricity Markets (Ofgem) created RIIO (Revenue = Incentives + Innovation + Outputs), the most comprehensive performance-based regulatory system yet developed to reflect changing market conditions. RIIO allows utilities to take advantage of the growing service economy and rewards utilities for achieving desired outcomes.

“With so many utilities launching new grid modernization initiatives, now is the time to address utility regulation and business model shortcomings. Energy is now extremely cheap if solar and wind power are the backbone of our electricity system,” said Mike O’Boyle, director of America’s Power Plan. “To succeed, utilities must be intrinsically motivated to invest in modern technologies that make the grid more efficient, flexible, affordable and resilient. Navigating Utility Business Model Reformis a toolbox for policymakers, utilities and key stakeholders to do just that.”

— Solar Builder magazine

Internet of Energy update: Google, Stanford, SunTech to collaborate on new DER, customer load controllers

internet of energy

I assume this is what it looks like.

SunTech Drive is part of a new collaboration with both Stanford University and Google that is tied to the Department of Energy’s NODES (Networks of Distributed Energy Systems) initiative. The objective is to coordinate and control consumer loads and distributed energy resources (DERs) out to the absolute edge of the grid. SunTech Drive’s Pico family of universal variable speed motor controllers will be the end nodes driving each of the individual loads, upgrading installed systems to “smart” loads.

“I am glad that SunTech Drive joined Stanford University and Google in this DOE funded initiative to advance the state of the art in the area of distributed energy systems. The envisioned technology could revolutionize the IoT control in the domain of electric motors, by enabling a bi-directional, cloud-based communication and control for a wide variety of residential and industrial loads,” said Ana Radovanovic, Research Scientist at Google.

RELATED: Six solar industry storylines to watch from Solar Power International 2018

SunTech’s products offer full Internet-of-Things and solar ready variable frequency drives that will work with any electric motor regardless of voltage, frequency or phase. These universal motor con-trollers also support multiple analog and digital sensors making every motor an intelligent distributed energy end node. These products are deployed around the globe in applications including livestock cooling, water pumping and oil and gas installations.

“We are very excited to be partnering with SunTech Drive to develop the higher level software ar-chitectures that will leverage their Pico controller architecture at the end node,” said Ram Rajagopal, associate professor at Stanford University.

The project will also involve developing mechanisms for electric utilities to interact with individual loads using metadata schemas for both demand reduction and diversion load control.

“We are very excited to be partnering with such notable partners on a project with vast implications for the future of the grid,” said John LoPorto, Chief Executive Officer of SunTech Drive.

— Solar Builder magazine

Five ways to modernize the U.S. electric power grid via Advanced Energy Economy

Advanced Energy Economy

Advanced Energy Economy (AEE) and Citizens for Responsible Energy Solutions Forum (CRES Forum) released a policy paper outlining five recommendations to modernize the U.S. electric power grid. By unleashing advanced energy investment, encouraging innovation in the electricity sector, and providing more affordable energy options for all consumers, there are opportunities for Congress to expand our economy and invest in new energy resources. AEE and CRES Forum offer these recommendations for consideration in an effort to accomplish key eco-nomic and energy goals for the U.S.

The five recommendations embrace different technologies and innovations while also moving toward a more clean, secure, and affordable grid. These ideas include:

• Streamline Federal Permitting for Advanced Energy Projects
• Encourage Grid Planners to Consider Alternatives to Transmission Investment
• Allow Energy Storage and Energy Efficiency to Compete with Additional Generation
• Allow Large Customers to Choose their Electricity Sources
• Allow Utilities and Consumers to Benefit from Cloud Computing Software

RELATED: How a transparent, modern grid properly values solar, DER

“We see several ways Congress can drive market-based solutions that will drive investment and innovation in the economy while bringing affordable energy options to all Americans,” said Dylan Reed, Head of Congressional Affairs for Advanced Energy Economy. “Advanced energy already represents a major part of our economy as a $200 billion industry supporting more than 3 million jobs across the United States. These ideas can help drive even more economic and job growth while saving consumers money to put back into their wallets.”

”CRES supports an all-of-the-above strategy when it comes to energy. We believe that these market-based solutions offer an opportunity for all Americans to benefit from clean energy tech-nology and policies designed to encourage energy innovation, energy efficiency, and energy stor-age,” said CRES Forum Director of Policy and Advocacy Charles Hernick. “Our hope is that this guide provides energizing ideas for clean energy advocates, thought leaders, legislators, and think tanks alike. We see the value for consumers, businesses, and governments to engage in thoughtful discussion around these topics. These grid modernization strategies can make a differ-ence for years to come by providing affordable, reliable, secure, and clean energy solutions and advancing America’s energy economy.”

The opportunity for increased modernization across every state leads to lower energy costs and increased choice for consumers, while spurring investment and job creation for all advanced en-ergy resources across communities nationwide.

— Solar Builder magazine