Jinergy’s high-efficiency modules first to achieve new IEC certification via TUV Rheinland

JINERGY solar modules

The ultra-high efficiency heterojunction (HJT) module from Jinneng Clean Energy Technology Limited (JINERGY) passed the new IEC standards in a test conducted by TÜV Rheinland, an independent third-party testing, inspection and certification organization. JINERGY became the first photovoltaic enterprise to receive the certification.

The new PV module performance and safety standards (IEC 61215:2016 and IEC 61730:2016) issued by International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has raised the requirements on design and production of PV modules and set up entrance standards to regulate the PV market.

JINERGY, a leading PV cell and module manufacturer headquartered in Shanxi Province, China, follows a technology iteration strategy and has deployed three generations of cutting-edge technology, polycrystalline, Passivated Emitter and Rear Cell (PERC) monocrystalline and HJT. Among them, HJT is considered to be a bridge for solar cell efficiency to reach 25%.

Compared with other ultra-high efficiency technologies, HJT is manufactured using fewer procedures and JINERGY’s bifacial HJT module features excellent performance in weak light, leading temperature coefficient, and ultra-low degradation with N-type silicon wafer. Moreover, with a bifacial design, power output of JINERGY’s HJT module can be increased by 8%-20% in different application scenarios such as grasslands, cement floors and snow covered fields. The combination of dual glass and HJT eliminates PID fundamentally. JINERGY’S HJT modules help boost 44% overall power generation compared with regular polycrystalline modules.

Module Evolution: What big-time PV improvements will boost panel efficiency?

“Bifacial ultra-high HJT technology is an ideal solution to reduce levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), the widely used standard to evaluate investment for PV power stations. So far, mass production power of 72-cell bifacial HJT module has reached 400W and mass production efficiency of HJT cells has exceeded 22.5%,” said Dr. Liyou YANG, general manager of JINERGY. Dr. YANG also predicted that overall cost gap between HJT products and regular polycrystalline products would narrow down to 30% and the gap could further shrink to 20% in the future. After mass production of HJT modules, cost reduction and efficiency improvement will speed up solar power to reach grid parity.

— Solar Builder magazine

Jinergy’s high-efficiency modules first to achieve new IEC certification via TUV Rheinland

JINERGY solar modules

The ultra-high efficiency heterojunction (HJT) module from Jinneng Clean Energy Technology Limited (JINERGY) passed the new IEC standards in a test conducted by TÜV Rheinland, an independent third-party testing, inspection and certification organization. JINERGY became the first photovoltaic enterprise to receive the certification.

The new PV module performance and safety standards (IEC 61215:2016 and IEC 61730:2016) issued by International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has raised the requirements on design and production of PV modules and set up entrance standards to regulate the PV market.

JINERGY, a leading PV cell and module manufacturer headquartered in Shanxi Province, China, follows a technology iteration strategy and has deployed three generations of cutting-edge technology, polycrystalline, Passivated Emitter and Rear Cell (PERC) monocrystalline and HJT. Among them, HJT is considered to be a bridge for solar cell efficiency to reach 25%.

Compared with other ultra-high efficiency technologies, HJT is manufactured using fewer procedures and JINERGY’s bifacial HJT module features excellent performance in weak light, leading temperature coefficient, and ultra-low degradation with N-type silicon wafer. Moreover, with a bifacial design, power output of JINERGY’s HJT module can be increased by 8%-20% in different application scenarios such as grasslands, cement floors and snow covered fields. The combination of dual glass and HJT eliminates PID fundamentally. JINERGY’S HJT modules help boost 44% overall power generation compared with regular polycrystalline modules.

Module Evolution: What big-time PV improvements will boost panel efficiency?

“Bifacial ultra-high HJT technology is an ideal solution to reduce levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), the widely used standard to evaluate investment for PV power stations. So far, mass production power of 72-cell bifacial HJT module has reached 400W and mass production efficiency of HJT cells has exceeded 22.5%,” said Dr. Liyou YANG, general manager of JINERGY. Dr. YANG also predicted that overall cost gap between HJT products and regular polycrystalline products would narrow down to 30% and the gap could further shrink to 20% in the future. After mass production of HJT modules, cost reduction and efficiency improvement will speed up solar power to reach grid parity.

— Solar Builder magazine

Solar trade case update: Here’s a report the ITC sent explaining how ‘unforeseen’ the PV import problem was

Trade case solar

The final outcome of the Suniva/SolarWorld  trade case still hangs over the solar industry as Trump has until Jan. 26 to make the final decision on a remedy, following the International Trade Commission’s injury ruling way back in September. It was our assumption at that time that this was just a countdown until tariffs were implemented by the president, and we still feel that way, but the administration appears to at least be doing its due diligence before deciding.

First reported in this excellent piece from Greentech Media, a U.S. ambassador requested a supplemental report in November to assist in the decision making process, specifically to explain what “unforeseen” events led to the injury of domestic production of crystalline silicon photovoltaic (CSPV) cells and modules. Read over how the ITC defined unforeseen and answered this question here: ITC_Report_Suniva.

Why request this? Well, it could be preparation for a potential challenge to a tariff decision by China, on appeal to the World Trade Organization, which has struck down such tariffs in the past, specifically on this question of whether the issue at hand was truly “unforeseen.” Here are some select portions:

As part of its WTO accession, the government of China made a series of commitments concerning a variety of topics, including non-discrimination; transparency; investment; state-owned and state-invested enterprises; pricing policies; and fiscal, financial, and budgetary activities by the central government and sub-national levels of government. For example, the government of China agreed to implement market-oriented economic reforms and to abide by WTO rules and principles, including to “allow prices for traded goods and services in every sector to be determined by market forces,” to “eliminate all subsid{ies}” contingent on export performance or the use of domestic goods, and to “not influence, directly or indirectly, commercial decisions on the part of state-owned or state-invested enterprises.”12

In direct contradiction of these commitments – and unforeseen by the U.S. negotiators at the time that the United States acceded to GATT 1947, at the time that the United States acceded to the WTO, or at the time that the United States agreed to China’s accession to the
WTO – the government of China implemented a series of industrial policies, five-year plans, and other government support programs favoring renewable energy product manufacturing, including CSPV products. The government of China’s industrial policies, plans, and support programs took advantage of the existence of programs implemented by the U.S. government to encourage renewable energy consumption that, consistent with U.S. WTO obligations, did not favor U.S. manufacturers but instead were directed at owners of renewable energy systems. These industrial policies, plans, and government support took a variety of forms and led to vast overcapacity in China and subsequently in other countries as Chinese producers built facilities elsewhere, which in turn ultimately resulted in the increased imports of CSPV products causing serious injury to the domestic industry in the United States.

Our two cents per kWh

We are left wondering why the administration wanted this supplement, what was their reaction was to it (high fives? More concern about an appeal?) and what this could mean for a WTO if it comes to that. If you’d like our informed, non non-world trade case opinion, the explanation in the document doesn’t seem to prove the logic underneath their decision, possibly leaving it open to the WTO striking it down on appeal. But we also thought there was no way they could find serious injury. So, there’s that.

We just wanted to note the existence of this supplemental document and remind you that something wild still this way comes. Feel at least a little rest assured that some thought is going into this tariff decision (Trump is, like, super smart and a very stable genius after all).

— Solar Builder magazine

Tigo debuts its most cost-effective rapid shutdown solution yet

Tigo TS4 rapidshut down

Tigo released its new TS4-F (Fire Safety) to join the current TS4 Platform of integrated and retrofit/add-on junction box covers. As the most cost-effective rapid shutdown solution in the TS4 Platform, the TS4-F will accompany the family of products in the form of integrated PV modules by manufacturers worldwide. Consult your preferred PV module supplier or visit Tigo’s website for the new “integrated TS4-F” or “retrofit/add-on TS4-R-F,” available in Q1 2018.

As part of the TS4 Platform, the TS4-F utilizes the Ultra-High Definition Core (UHD-Core) and supports any PV module up to 475W with voltage up to 90V and current up to 12A. Furthermore, TS4-F uniquely supports the SunSpec Alliance signaling specification with powerline communication (PLC) and will work with any SunSpec-compliant rapid shutdown initiator. Tigo tested compatibility with multiple inverter suppliers – including SMA – and will continue to expand its compliant inverter portfolio .

The highlights of TS4-F include:

• NEC 690.12 2017 Rapid Shutdown solution
• Compatible with all modules up to 475W
• Supports SunSpec Alliance rapid shutdown specifications
• Compatible with all SunSpec initiators
• Module-level deactivation
• Automatic or manual shutdown
• Over-temperature and over-voltage protection
• Patent protected
• Easy installation
• Ultra-High Definition Core (UHD-Core) technology for superior performance
• UL-certified pending
• Available as a PV module integrated and retrofit/add-solution

“TS4-F was developed to offer our customers the first patent-protected MLPE in the market that supports SunSpec Alliance signaling specifications,” says Zvi Alon, CEO at Tigo. “For PV system owners who wish to address only the mandatory shutdown needs and do not require optimization or monitoring, the TS4-F provides a certified, cost-effective rapid shutdown solution with all the safety features of the TS4 Platform.”

What’s the difference between TS4-F and TS4-S?

Tigo’s TS4-F and TS4-S are both rapid shutdown devices, however TS4-F is a PLC SunSpec-compliant signaling while TS4-S uses wireless signaling. TS4-F requires an initiator to comply with the rapid shutdown requirements while TS4-S uses Tigo’s CCA and Gateway to transmit a rapid shutdown signal. TS4-F cost-effectively targets rapid shutdown while TS4-S includes module-level monitoring with rapid shutdown. Both TS4-F and TS4-S are patent-protected.

Tigo’s TS4-F is ready to ship as an integrated solution with module manufacturers worldwide. For price and delivery call +1.408.402.0802 ext. 1, email sales@tigoenergy.com, or visit www.tigoenergy.com.

— Solar Builder magazine

Solar PV glass market projected to hit $33 billion by 2025

solar glass skyscraper

The global solar PV glass market is expected to be valued at $33.7 billion by 2025, according to The Solar PV Glass Market, 2014-2025 report now available on Research and Markets. Growing social and political consensus aimed at adopting clean energy sources is expected to drive the market in the coming years.

Solar PV glass is being increasingly used in various applications such as residential, non-residential and utility sectors. Tempered glass, in particular, is being employed in roofing applications as well as in the manufacturing of glass windows. In developing countries, regional governments are taking various initiatives to install solar panels not only on newly constructed buildings but also on old building structures. Government initiatives to achieve a sustainable future with clean energy are anticipated to positively drive the market over the forecast period.

Residential application segment is witnessing growth due to the rising penetration from untapped markets such as Asia Pacific as well as Central & South America. First-mover advantage and relatively low acquisition cost in untapped regions remain key driving factors in this application segment. However, the cost and length of customer acquisition is a primary concern and is projected to restrain the growth of the application segment over the next eight years.

— Solar Builder magazine