Empire Statement: New York mandates 100 percent renewable energy by 2040

new york climate leadership

New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo is ushering in a new energy era for the Empire State by signing the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act into law, which will require the state’s utilities to produce 70 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2030 and calls for 100 percent carbon-free electricity generation by 2040.

In addition, Cuomo is calling for the country’s largest offshore wind procurement — nearly 1.7 GW — with the selection of two offshore wind projects, that will create enough energy to power over 1 million homes, create more than 1,600 jobs, and result in $3.2 billion in economic activity.

In total, the CLCPA codifies commitments to install 9 GW of offshore wind by 2035; 6 GW of distributed solar by 2025; and 3 GW of energy storage by 2030.

“Cries for a new green movement are hollow political rhetoric if not combined with aggressive goals and a realistic plan on how to achieve them,” Cuomo stated. “With this agreement, New York will lead the way in developing the largest source of offshore wind power in the nation, and today I will sign the most aggressive climate law in the United States of America.”

Highlights of Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act

  • The CLCPA requires the State to achieve a carbon free electricity system by 2040 and reduce greenhouse gas emissions 85% below 1990 levels by 2050.
  • New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will, through the adoption of regulations, drive an 85% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, with an interim mandate of 40% reduction in emissions by 2030 (both relative to 1990 levels). The Climate Action Council will develop a plan to offset remaining emissions through carbon capture or other technologies, resulting in a carbon-neutral economy.
  • The CLCPA mandates that at least 70% of New York’s electricity come from renewable energy sources such as wind and solar by 2030, and that the state’s power system is 100% carbon neutral by 2040.
  • The CLCPA codifies commitments to install 9 GW of offshore wind by 2035; 6 GW of distributed solar by 2025; and 3 GW of energy storage by 2030.
  • Importantly, implementation of the CLCPA will target investments to benefit disadvantaged communities. Relevant state agencies will invest 35% of clean energy program resources to benefit disadvantaged communities, and will aim to invest 40%.
  • Heads of relevant state agencies and legislative appointees will craft the roadmap of policies needed to achieve the law’s mandates. The Council, co-chaired by the New York State Energy Research and Development Agency (NYSERDA) and DEC will establish sector specific working groups to make sure experts and stakeholders inform all policies developed under the CLCPA. Planned working groups include a just transition working group, as well as working groups on transportation, agriculture, energy-intensive and trade-exposed industries, land use and energy efficiency.

— Solar Builder magazine

Portland General Electric proposes mix of renewables, energy efficiency, demand response in integrated resource plan

portland general electric

Portland General Electric Co. (PGE) presented a new integrated resource plan to the Oregon Public Utility Commission that focuses on adding more renewable power, capturing more energy efficiency and partnering with customers to help balance energy supply and demand during periods of peak energy use.

“This is the first resource plan developed since we expanded our commitment to cut PGE greenhouse gas emissions,” said Maria Pope, PGE’s president and CEO. “It proposes measured steps we can take today to address climate change, while allowing flexibility for adjustments as technology and policies continue to evolve.”

Developed through a multi-year research and engagement process that included constructing and testing 43 different portfolios to identify resource actions needed between now and 2025, the plan calls for:

  • 150 average megawatts of additional renewable resources by 2023.
  • A similar amount (157 average megawatts) of additional cost-effective energy efficiency measures.
  • Increased reliance on demand response to help balance sources and uses of electricity during peak months. This includes 141 megawatts during winter months, 211 megawatts during summer months, and 4 megawatts of customer battery storage.
  • Additional actions to help meet capacity needs resulting from expiring contracts and the retirement of baseload coal plants like PGE’s Boardman Generating Station.

Don’t miss our Solar Power International preview issue in September — subscribe to Solar Builder magazine (print or digital) for FREE today

PGE filed the plan with the OPUC July 19, kicking off a public review process before commissioners decide whether the utility has identified an appropriate least-cost, least-risk plan to reliably serve customers, consistent with applicable state and federal energy policies. Under the plan, PGE will seek to meet customers’ energy needs without building greenhouse gas-emitting resources, even as the company prepares to cease coal-fired operations at Boardman at the end of 2020.

Action on the resource plan by the commission – the formal regulatory term is called “acknowledgement” – is expected by the first quarter of 2020. If the OPUC acknowledges the plan, PGE will then conduct a request for proposals for new renewable resources, implement the necessary energy efficiency actions and demand response programs, and seek opportunities for bilateral negotiations with existing generators in the region to meet resource capacity needs. If enough capacity cannot be acquired through bilateral negotiations, the company will consult with the OPUC and potentially conduct a second RFP, which would be limited to non-emitting energy resources.

More from PGE

Customer and stakeholder insights and feedback were instrumental in shaping the company’s approach, which was also guided by PGE’s Vision for a Clean Energy Future. The company introduced its vision as a white paper in 2018 to help lay out a course for accelerating Oregon’s clean energy transformation. Recent initiatives in support of this effort include:

  • The announcement earlier this year that PGE will partner in developing the new Wheatridge Renewable Energy Facility in eastern Oregon, the first generating plant of its scale to combine wind and solar energy with battery storage.
  • Advancement of electrification in other portions of the economy, especially through electric cars, transit buses and other vehicles in the transportation system, which currently account for 40% of Oregon GHG emissions.
  • Enhanced reliability through system modernization to create a smarter, more resilient, more flexible grid.
  • Elimination of coal-fired generation from PGE’s resource mix no later than 2035 to help decarbonize our energy system, starting with decommissioning of the Boardman facility.

— Solar Builder magazine

Portland General Electric proposes mix of renewables, energy efficiency, demand response in integrated resource plan

portland general electric

Portland General Electric Co. (PGE) presented a new integrated resource plan to the Oregon Public Utility Commission that focuses on adding more renewable power, capturing more energy efficiency and partnering with customers to help balance energy supply and demand during periods of peak energy use.

“This is the first resource plan developed since we expanded our commitment to cut PGE greenhouse gas emissions,” said Maria Pope, PGE’s president and CEO. “It proposes measured steps we can take today to address climate change, while allowing flexibility for adjustments as technology and policies continue to evolve.”

Developed through a multi-year research and engagement process that included constructing and testing 43 different portfolios to identify resource actions needed between now and 2025, the plan calls for:

  • 150 average megawatts of additional renewable resources by 2023.
  • A similar amount (157 average megawatts) of additional cost-effective energy efficiency measures.
  • Increased reliance on demand response to help balance sources and uses of electricity during peak months. This includes 141 megawatts during winter months, 211 megawatts during summer months, and 4 megawatts of customer battery storage.
  • Additional actions to help meet capacity needs resulting from expiring contracts and the retirement of baseload coal plants like PGE’s Boardman Generating Station.

Don’t miss our Solar Power International preview issue in September — subscribe to Solar Builder magazine (print or digital) for FREE today

PGE filed the plan with the OPUC July 19, kicking off a public review process before commissioners decide whether the utility has identified an appropriate least-cost, least-risk plan to reliably serve customers, consistent with applicable state and federal energy policies. Under the plan, PGE will seek to meet customers’ energy needs without building greenhouse gas-emitting resources, even as the company prepares to cease coal-fired operations at Boardman at the end of 2020.

Action on the resource plan by the commission – the formal regulatory term is called “acknowledgement” – is expected by the first quarter of 2020. If the OPUC acknowledges the plan, PGE will then conduct a request for proposals for new renewable resources, implement the necessary energy efficiency actions and demand response programs, and seek opportunities for bilateral negotiations with existing generators in the region to meet resource capacity needs. If enough capacity cannot be acquired through bilateral negotiations, the company will consult with the OPUC and potentially conduct a second RFP, which would be limited to non-emitting energy resources.

More from PGE

Customer and stakeholder insights and feedback were instrumental in shaping the company’s approach, which was also guided by PGE’s Vision for a Clean Energy Future. The company introduced its vision as a white paper in 2018 to help lay out a course for accelerating Oregon’s clean energy transformation. Recent initiatives in support of this effort include:

  • The announcement earlier this year that PGE will partner in developing the new Wheatridge Renewable Energy Facility in eastern Oregon, the first generating plant of its scale to combine wind and solar energy with battery storage.
  • Advancement of electrification in other portions of the economy, especially through electric cars, transit buses and other vehicles in the transportation system, which currently account for 40% of Oregon GHG emissions.
  • Enhanced reliability through system modernization to create a smarter, more resilient, more flexible grid.
  • Elimination of coal-fired generation from PGE’s resource mix no later than 2035 to help decarbonize our energy system, starting with decommissioning of the Boardman facility.

— Solar Builder magazine

ACORE urges Ohio Legislature to support pro-renewable, pro-consumer policies

ACORE

With the legislative session in Ohio scheduled to end on Wednesday, the American Council on Renewable Energy (ACORE) is respectfully urging state legislators to support pro-renewable policies and reject any legislation that would stymie renewable energy growth in the state.

Following is a statement from Gregory Wetstone, ACORE’s President and CEO:

“We remain deeply concerned about any potential rollback of Ohio’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). While we were pleased to see some progress in the Senate substitute to House Bill 6, notably the exclusion of an unfair township referendum provision that discriminated against wind development, we are troubled that the legislation as currently drafted would significantly weaken the state’s RPS while providing unwarranted subsidies to uneconomic coal and nuclear power plants.

“Under a supportive policy framework, Ohio could see more than $11 billion of new investment in renewable power within the next five years. We would hate to see the state undermine this massive economic opportunity, which could ensure low electric rates and a healthier environment for Buckeye State businesses and consumers.”

Background

Last month, ACORE sent Ohio Governor Mike DeWine a letter urging the opposition of House Bill 6 in favor of legislation that does not place at risk or limit renewable energy investment and deployment.

According to an analysis by members of ACORE’s U.S. Partnership for Renewable Energy Finance program, more reasonable wind turbine setback requirements, a viable RPS, and a supportive development approach could result in more than $11 billion in new investment and economic activity in Ohio over the next five years.

Today, the renewable energy sector employs nearly 10,000 Ohioans and contributes millions of dollars each year in local revenue.

— Solar Builder magazine

ACORE urges Ohio Legislature to support pro-renewable, pro-consumer policies

ACORE

With the legislative session in Ohio scheduled to end on Wednesday, the American Council on Renewable Energy (ACORE) is respectfully urging state legislators to support pro-renewable policies and reject any legislation that would stymie renewable energy growth in the state.

Following is a statement from Gregory Wetstone, ACORE’s President and CEO:

“We remain deeply concerned about any potential rollback of Ohio’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). While we were pleased to see some progress in the Senate substitute to House Bill 6, notably the exclusion of an unfair township referendum provision that discriminated against wind development, we are troubled that the legislation as currently drafted would significantly weaken the state’s RPS while providing unwarranted subsidies to uneconomic coal and nuclear power plants.

“Under a supportive policy framework, Ohio could see more than $11 billion of new investment in renewable power within the next five years. We would hate to see the state undermine this massive economic opportunity, which could ensure low electric rates and a healthier environment for Buckeye State businesses and consumers.”

Background

Last month, ACORE sent Ohio Governor Mike DeWine a letter urging the opposition of House Bill 6 in favor of legislation that does not place at risk or limit renewable energy investment and deployment.

According to an analysis by members of ACORE’s U.S. Partnership for Renewable Energy Finance program, more reasonable wind turbine setback requirements, a viable RPS, and a supportive development approach could result in more than $11 billion in new investment and economic activity in Ohio over the next five years.

Today, the renewable energy sector employs nearly 10,000 Ohioans and contributes millions of dollars each year in local revenue.

— Solar Builder magazine