Hanover, New Hampshire adds solar array to roof of town hall

Hanover solar project

A 16.64-kilowatt rooftop solar array recently installed at the Town Hall in Hanover, N.H., is demonstrating the municipality’s commitment to transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. The grid-tied system includes 52 solar panels and will generate approximately 17,000 hours of clean energy each year. ReVision Energy, a local employee-owned solar company, handled the installation.

A second municipal solar array currently under contract will be installed on Hanover’s water reclamation facility. The 69.76-kilowatt, grid-tied project will include 218 solar panels which will generate nearly 80,000-kilowatt hours of solar electricity each year and offset roughly 41 tons of carbon pollution annually.

In 2017, Hanover became the first “Ready for 100” town in New Hampshire. The program is a Sierra Club initiative that encourages leaders across the country to commit to 100% renewable energy by the year 2050. The municipality approved an article at its 2017 town meeting which set the community-wide goal of transitioning to 100% renewable electricity by 2030 and transitioning heating and transportation to run on clean, renewable sources of energy by 2050.

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On May 14, voters will decide on a warrant article that would authorize the Selectboard in Hanover to enter into electric Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) with solar installers, who will install, own and maintain one or more solar systems on town-owned buildings or land, and to grant leases and easements for access to the locations of these systems. The town would then purchase green power generated by the solar arrays located on town property and will have the option to purchase any solar arrays located on town property in the future.

“It is our desire to offset the entire municipal load and develop additional capacity for community solar when regulations are more favorable,” according to Peter Kulbacki, Director of Public Works for the Town of Hanover. “Additionally, Hanover is perusing a green power supply option for residents and small businesses as well as helping develop PPA’s which could provide our larger users with a long-term green power option with stable rates.”

In 2014, Hanover was named the Environmental Protection Agency’s first Green Power Community in New Hampshire. Solar energy projects across town include businesses and town residents plus institutions like Dartmouth College where nearly 700 kilowatts of solar arrays have been installed across campus.

— Solar Builder magazine

Hanover, New Hampshire adds solar array to roof of town hall

Hanover solar project

A 16.64-kilowatt rooftop solar array recently installed at the Town Hall in Hanover, N.H., is demonstrating the municipality’s commitment to transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. The grid-tied system includes 52 solar panels and will generate approximately 17,000 hours of clean energy each year. ReVision Energy, a local employee-owned solar company, handled the installation.

A second municipal solar array currently under contract will be installed on Hanover’s water reclamation facility. The 69.76-kilowatt, grid-tied project will include 218 solar panels which will generate nearly 80,000-kilowatt hours of solar electricity each year and offset roughly 41 tons of carbon pollution annually.

In 2017, Hanover became the first “Ready for 100” town in New Hampshire. The program is a Sierra Club initiative that encourages leaders across the country to commit to 100% renewable energy by the year 2050. The municipality approved an article at its 2017 town meeting which set the community-wide goal of transitioning to 100% renewable electricity by 2030 and transitioning heating and transportation to run on clean, renewable sources of energy by 2050.

Don’t miss our Solar + Storage issue in July — subscribe to Solar Builder magazine (print or digital) for FREE today

On May 14, voters will decide on a warrant article that would authorize the Selectboard in Hanover to enter into electric Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) with solar installers, who will install, own and maintain one or more solar systems on town-owned buildings or land, and to grant leases and easements for access to the locations of these systems. The town would then purchase green power generated by the solar arrays located on town property and will have the option to purchase any solar arrays located on town property in the future.

“It is our desire to offset the entire municipal load and develop additional capacity for community solar when regulations are more favorable,” according to Peter Kulbacki, Director of Public Works for the Town of Hanover. “Additionally, Hanover is perusing a green power supply option for residents and small businesses as well as helping develop PPA’s which could provide our larger users with a long-term green power option with stable rates.”

In 2014, Hanover was named the Environmental Protection Agency’s first Green Power Community in New Hampshire. Solar energy projects across town include businesses and town residents plus institutions like Dartmouth College where nearly 700 kilowatts of solar arrays have been installed across campus.

— Solar Builder magazine

Revision Energy merges with Energy Emporium

Revision Energy project

Rooftop solar array completed by ReVision Energy at Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH.

ReVision Energy has entered into a merger agreement with Energy Emporium of Enfield, New Hampshire. Under the terms of the agreement, Energy Emporium will be integrated as part of ReVision Energy, who will offer customer service to all existing Energy Emporium customers and bring onboard Energy Emporium’s Kimberley Quirk and Anita Gonzalez as ReVision Energy employee-owners. Quirk and Gonzalez will continue to operate out of their Enfield location.

“ReVision’s mission is to transition our region to 100% solar and solar-powered complementary technologies, and the Upper Valley is critical to that effort,” said Dan Clapp, ReVision Energy co-founder and general manager of New Hampshire operations. “To that end, Kim and Anita of Energy Emporium are exactly the kinds of people who have been attracted to our mission and have built an impressive, customer-centric business over the last 10 years. It is truly an honor that we get to welcome them and their solar champion customers into the ReVision Energy family.”

“With this merger, Energy Emporium’s existing customers, as well as future customers, are assured of excellent long-term support for their investments in solar and renewable energy,” said Quirk, founder of Energy Emporium. “We can now offer a more diversified set of products to complement solar—such as batteries, cold climate heat pumps, electric vehicle chargers and more.”

Energy Emporium was founded in 2009 in Enfield, New Hampshire, with a mission to help people reduce or eliminate their fossil fuel use. The company was the chosen installer for the Vital Communities Solarize programs in Hanover, Lebanon and Enfield.

Energy Emporium is housed in a zero-energy building that was renovated from an 1850’s historic shell. Sunshine generates the building’s heat, hot water and electricity. The ground floor of the building serves as a showroom and resource center for information on alternative and renewable energy sources.

— Solar Builder magazine

Revision Energy merges with Energy Emporium

Revision Energy project

Rooftop solar array completed by ReVision Energy at Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH.

ReVision Energy has entered into a merger agreement with Energy Emporium of Enfield, New Hampshire. Under the terms of the agreement, Energy Emporium will be integrated as part of ReVision Energy, who will offer customer service to all existing Energy Emporium customers and bring onboard Energy Emporium’s Kimberley Quirk and Anita Gonzalez as ReVision Energy employee-owners. Quirk and Gonzalez will continue to operate out of their Enfield location.

“ReVision’s mission is to transition our region to 100% solar and solar-powered complementary technologies, and the Upper Valley is critical to that effort,” said Dan Clapp, ReVision Energy co-founder and general manager of New Hampshire operations. “To that end, Kim and Anita of Energy Emporium are exactly the kinds of people who have been attracted to our mission and have built an impressive, customer-centric business over the last 10 years. It is truly an honor that we get to welcome them and their solar champion customers into the ReVision Energy family.”

“With this merger, Energy Emporium’s existing customers, as well as future customers, are assured of excellent long-term support for their investments in solar and renewable energy,” said Quirk, founder of Energy Emporium. “We can now offer a more diversified set of products to complement solar—such as batteries, cold climate heat pumps, electric vehicle chargers and more.”

Energy Emporium was founded in 2009 in Enfield, New Hampshire, with a mission to help people reduce or eliminate their fossil fuel use. The company was the chosen installer for the Vital Communities Solarize programs in Hanover, Lebanon and Enfield.

Energy Emporium is housed in a zero-energy building that was renovated from an 1850’s historic shell. Sunshine generates the building’s heat, hot water and electricity. The ground floor of the building serves as a showroom and resource center for information on alternative and renewable energy sources.

— Solar Builder magazine

Tupelo Music Hall cutting ribbon on its 100-kW solar array

Revision Energy project

A public ribbon cutting is scheduled on October 16 at Tupelo Music Hall, in New Hampshire — a facility that is believed to be the first solar-powered venue of its kind in New England. The event will recognize Tupelo’s clean energy transition and will include remarks by local leaders.

A 313-panel (100-kW) rooftop solar array recently installed by ReVision Energy at the new, 20,000 square-foot facility will generate 114,000 kWh per year, enough to offset 100% of the music hall’s annual electric load.

“From the time we started construction, one goal of Tupelo Music Hall was to operate the business in a way that minimizes our carbon footprint as much as possible,” said Tupelo Owner Scott Hayward. “The use of biodegradable goods, only installing LED lighting, recycling what we can and purchasing the most energy-efficient appliances possible are a few ways we have done this.”

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From day one, the transition to solar energy is a cash flow-positive arrangement for Tupelo. With financing, Hayward is able to immediately lower his electric costs since solar loan payments will be less than what he has been paying the utility on an annual basis. After a five-year payback period, the array will generate free electricity for decades to come. The array is forecast to save over $750,000 in electric costs over the life of the system.

“ReVision is excited about Tupelo’s leadership of the clean energy transition, as one of the top music venues in New England,” said Dan Weeks, Director of Market Development at ReVision Energy. “Thanks to advances in solar technology, businesses like Tupelo – and anyone with a sunny roof or lawn – no longer have to choose between saving money and saving the environment. We’re thrilled to work with Tupelo as the first music hall we know of in New England to go 100% solar.”

— Solar Builder magazine