Tiny Home That’s Easy to Take on The Road

The company Rocky Mountain Tiny Houses of Colorado have built another great tiny home. This one bears the odd name Ol’ Berthoud Blue, and it was commissioned by a client who had tried to build their own tiny home, but found it too demanding.

The home features an interesting layout, with lots of space allocated to the bedroom and bathroom, while it was also constructed with frequent travelling in mind.

Ol’ Berthoud Blue was built atop a 24 ft (7.3 m)-long trailer. The front entrance opens into the spacious living area, which takes up most of the ground floor. This area also houses the kitchen, which features lots of counter space, a full-size fridge, a propane three-burner stove and a sink. There is also a dining table for two. The sofa in the living area can be pulled out into a 6 ft (1.8 m)-long guest bed.

The bathroom is just off the kitchen and is large enough to fit an ALFI cedar bathtub, as well as a sink and composting toilet. In an interesting design choice, one has to go through the bathroom to access the winding staircase that leads to the sleeping loft. The latter is quite spacious, and can serve as a lounge as well. They installed lots of windows in this area, which lets in plenty of natural light. The home also features a second loft, which can be used for storage.

Some of the cabinetry was custom made, while some was purchased from IKEA. Since the owners intend to travel a lot, most of the storage areas have rods or other obstructions to prevent things from falling. The tiny home gets its power via a standard RV hookup, though they plan to add a solar power system in the future. A mini-split system takes care of the heating and cooling needs.

The home cost roughly $87,000 to build.

Luxury Energy Efficient Home

Often we associate sustainability with downsizing to a smaller home and thereby reducing our carbon footprint, but it doesn’t have to be that way. As MVRDV, a Holland-based firm, proves with their recently completed Casa Kwantes. The latter is a luxury home, which features a brick façade, plenty of glazing, and an array of energy efficient tech. The design of the home itself was inspired by 1930s architecture, but it features a modern twist.

Casa Kwantes measures 5,166 sq ft (480 sq m) and is a two-story family residence. It is located in Rotterdam, Holland, and the architects designed the interior layout based on the owner’s wishes and needs. The living room, dining room, kitchen and library are located on the first floor, as is the two-car garage. The living room features a long, custom made wooden unit which runs along the entire wall and provides ample amounts of storage space. On the second floor, there are two bedrooms, each with an en suite bathroom. The home also features a basement and a guest bathroom.

The back wall of the home has no windows, while the front is comprised of floor to ceiling windows, and curved, which makes for some unusually shaped rooms. The curved glazing wraps around the interior continuously, offering views into all the rooms, while the balcony allows for easy access to all the spaces. Since none of the windows face the street, only the garden, the occupants enjoy lots of privacy, while the windows also let in plenty of natural daylight.

Casa Kwantes is connected to the grid, but it also has a large solar panel array mounted on the roof. According to the designers, the system will most likely provide enough energy for the entire home, but this will be proven during the next year, since the home was only just completed a couple of months ago. The home also features a ground-source heat pump, which together with the heat exchanger provides energy-efficient heating and cooling for the home.

Tiny Home for Cold Climates

As more and more people decide to downsize to a tiny home, it has become imperative that these homes be made as cold-proof as possible. The Quebec, Canada-based firm Minimaliste recently completed this luxury tiny home for a client, which is exactly that. Apart from being very well-insulated, it also features many other comforts usually reserved for larger houses.

The so-called Sakura home measures 380 sq ft (35 sq m) and was built on a gooseneck trailer. it features a living area, which can easily be converted into a dining room. This is done with the help of modular sofa pieces that can be moved around, and a coffee table that is designed to open up into a 22 by 60 inch (56 by 152 cm) dining table, which can seat up to four people. The home also features a large bedroom and a bathroom big enough for a tub.

The kitchen runs along two facing walls, and is equipped with a fridge and stove. The bedroom is in a loft, which is accessible via a storage staircase. There is additional storage under the bed, and there is a lot of headroom in this area. There is also a second loft which can be used as a sort of reading nook and provides access to the cedar roof deck, through a skylight.

The home is also equipped with a number of sustainable features such as a composting toilet, hydronic radiant heating in the floors, a Lunos air exchanger with a heat recovery system, and a three-level water filtration system. Water passing through this filter goes through a pressure regulator, a big sediments filter, a fine sediments filter, and lastly through a water sanitizer, so pretty much any kind of water can be filtered using it.

The Sakura is a luxury home with many add-ons, so the price tag reflects that, since it cost a whopping $102,000.

Tiny Apartment Made More Spacious With a Clever Loft

Small apartments can quickly feel very cramped, but good design and some out of the box thinking can go a long way to fixing that. A great example of just how well is this Taipei, Taiwan apartment. Originally little more than a room, it was transformed into an open, cozy home for two by the firm A Lentil Design.

The apartment measures just 355 sq ft (33 sq m) and the first thing they took care of was knocking down some walls, to make it as open as possible. The next step was adding a loft, which houses the bedroom and really frees up the lower level space, while offering some privacy. The small apartment had two bedrooms, a bathroom, and a kitchen. They redesigned this by knocking down one of the bedroom’s walls to make a larger living room. The kitchen is located on one side of the living room, and is also an open space with an island that can be used as a dining space or a working area.

In the loft, the bed is placed atop a raised platform, which has drawers hidden underneath it for some extra storage. There is also enough room in the loft for a small sitting area, while the view of the surrounding cityscape is stunning. The loft is accessible via a staircase that serves a number of other functions as well. Apart from the usual storage space built into it, the staircase also serves as a separation between the entryway and the rest of the apartment. It also leads to a second loft which could be converted into a child’s bedroom if needed. For now, the occupants use it as a storage space. The bed itself rests atop an elevated platform and has drawers hidden underneath it for some extra storage. The apartment also features large windows, which let in plenty of natural light and make it appear much more spacious, while also aiding ventilation.

This is another great example of just how little is required to turn a tiny, cramped, old-style apartment into a cozy, modern home.

French Tiny House Does More with Less

ext

When it comes to tiny homes, most of them already do more with less, but in France the laws governing how large a towable home can be to still be roadworthy are even more stringent. So the firm Blauchon, charged with designing this tiny home, had less to work with since the maximum dimensions of the house could only be 21 ft (6.5 m) long and 13 ft (4 m) high. They still managed to create a comfortable, permanent home for a family of three.

The tiny home is called Calypso, and it is clad in red cedar, with one section treated with the Japanese Shou Sugi Ban method, which seems to have been used for decorative purposes in this case, and not as a preservation method. Since the home is tiny indeed, they installed plenty of glazing to allow light to flood the interior and make it appear more spacious.

viewdown

Much of the interior is taken up by the living space, which features a kitchenette, a dining area, and storage space. The sofa also in this space hides a good amount of storage and can also be used as a guest bed. The kitchenette is fitted with a sink, stove, and fridge, and also has a breakfast bar large enough to sit three.

kitchne

sofa

bath

The bathroom features a composting toilet and a shower, though there is no sink to save space. The family must use the kitchen sink for washing too. The child’s bedroom is also on the ground floor, and is separated off from the rest of the home by a door. The parent’s bedroom, on the other hand, is located in a loft that’s accessible by a ladder.

bed

child

The kid’s room is fitted with a raised bed that has two wardrobes under it, and can be accessed by a removable staircase that also has integrated storage for toys and such. They were also able to fit a small desk into the space, so the child can do their homework.

The home features standard hookups for electricity and water. For insulating the floor they used sheep’s wool, while cotton, linen and hemp was used to insulate the walls and wood fiber in the ceiling. The home features LED lighting throughout.

Unfortunately, there is no information as to how much this tiny house cost to build.